Cannes film – Cannes Fest http://cannesfest.org/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 15:39:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cannesfest.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Cannes film – Cannes Fest http://cannesfest.org/ 32 32 Shooting the Stars at the Cannes Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/shooting-the-stars-at-the-cannes-film-festival/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 15:39:37 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/shooting-the-stars-at-the-cannes-film-festival/ pop quiz, hotshot: Which world event brings together the most media? The Olympic Games, indeed, but do you know the most publicized event? That would be the Cannes Film Festival, a fact that might be more surprising if it weren’t included in the first paragraph of an article about the Cannes Film Festival. Trust us, […]]]>

pop quiz, hotshot: Which world event brings together the most media?

The Olympic Games, indeed, but do you know the most publicized event? That would be the Cannes Film Festival, a fact that might be more surprising if it weren’t included in the first paragraph of an article about the Cannes Film Festival. Trust us, there will be a storm in the pub.

Every May, around 4,500 journalists and God knows how many movie stars flock to the south of France for a fortnight of fashion, romps and film. (Presumably in that order.) The festival turned 75 this year and, unlike most of us, Cannes is only getting more alluring with age. And much of its mystique resides in the countless red carpet and after-party photographs that are broadcast around the world.

Because in addition to being the most glamorous date in the film industry, the Cannes fortnight can also make the career of many photographers, offering an unprecedented opportunity to network with publications and potential clients – and to take a few shots during that you are there. We spoke to square mile friend Bertie Watson about his Cannes experiences.

How was your first experience in Cannes?

My first time in Cannes was in 2019 and it was a whirlwind experience. Evenings at the villa, premieres on the red carpet and of course a chance to perfect my French.

You went on your own dollar, right?

I had just made the decision to stop pursuing my career as an opera singer, so I didn’t know anyone in the industry and had no clients. I had a clear vision of who I wanted to work with, film and TV people, so I decided to head to the belly of the beast, Cannes.

I figured if I hopped on a cheap flight and stayed at an affordable Airbnb for a fortnight, it would give me plenty of time to meet potential customers. It was a great return on investment.

Alexander Kuznetsov

Do you hustle once you arrive?

The day after my arrival, I walked around La Croisette, the main street where everything happens, entering all the beach clubs, → → luxury designer boutiques and hotels, asking to meet their PR/marketing managers. I also sent about 1,000 emails before I got there to various people. I got about 80 responses and ended up aiming for two of them. It’s a numbers game. At the end of the festival I had shot for four new clients.

Organizing parties? Sneaking on yachts?

After photographing an evening at the Hotel du Cap Eden Rock, one of the guests sent me a photo, yes a photo, of an invitation to a very secret evening at Cap D’Antibes. After a long, winding gravel road through a thick pine forest, we arrived at a queue of around 300 people in the middle of what seemed like a mini forest. Guard dogs, security and helicopters were keeping a strict perimeter so I honestly had little hope of getting in.

Then, out of nowhere, I spotted a friend of mine who I worked with in retail years ago who was the spokesperson. To the disbelief of all the impatient people queuing, I was cheerfully greeted and hopped on one of the three golf carts used to drive to the front of the location.

Once there, the forest split into a huge clearing replaced by what I can only describe as the largest mansion I have seen in my life. It didn’t seem real.

Alexander Kuznetsov

Random encounters with celebrities?

I won’t name who hosted the party as I signed an NDA, but suffice it to say it was Mr. DiCaprio who made a brief appearance, cap, engaged sunglasses and an outrageous amount of entourage/ safety around him. Mysterious man!

How did you experience Cannes this year compared to the premiere?

This year I had an amazing week-long job with Deadline Hollywood, which meant I could be a little more relaxed before the festival.

Have you ever been able to watch any of the films?

I’m mostly too busy to attend one of the premieres, but if I get an invitation and I’m free, I don’t turn them down. And anyway, based on previous Cannes experience, this red carpet is not for the faint-hearted.

How do you spend your free time? Or is there no such thing?

You have to have a balance in life. Usually I get up early and go swimming in the sea to get the blood flowing before work. Other than that, it’s important to take the time to see where you’re turning, go explore the local markets, get lost off the beaten path and enjoy the scenery.

Is the festival as glamorous as people think?

Yes and no. What I will say is that you will constantly pass extreme juxtapositions; for example, walking down the Croisette, you will find a 70-year-old beggar asking for change who is passed by a lady in diamonds on her way to a premiere surrounded by a security guard. It’s a mixture of bizarre and surreal.

Larissa Corda

What’s the biggest misconception about the Cannes Film Festival?

Everywhere has air conditioning; This is not the case.

Tell us about these two shoots…

My friend Aleksandr Kuznetsov, an extremely talented and one-to-watch actor, who recently wrapped promotion for his latest film Fantastic Beasts: Dumbledore’s Secrets, has agreed to shoot before Cannes wakes up. We wanted to shoot when the city was sleeping and do what everyone should do when they come to Cannes, get in the water! We met at his apartment at 5am, ending in the sea at 7am, safe to say this was one of my favorite shoots to date.

And I photographed Larisa Corda (a brilliant doctor who helps people conceive) just outside Cannes before the pandemic hit the world. It was a beautiful villa nestled behind the beautiful Garoupe beach and we were shooting some of its promotional content. It made sense to take advantage of the amazing location.

Any advice for budding photographers heading to Cannes?

Go with an open mind, don’t expect anything to happen, and connect with people on a human level. Don’t think about what they can do for you, it’s what you can do for them.

Discover Bertie’s work on bertiewatson.com. Follow Bertie on Instagram: @mrbertiewatson

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Cannes movie ‘The Eight Mountains’ lands North American deal with Sideshow and Janus https://cannesfest.org/cannes-movie-the-eight-mountains-lands-north-american-deal-with-sideshow-and-janus/ Tue, 12 Jul 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/cannes-movie-the-eight-mountains-lands-north-american-deal-with-sideshow-and-janus/ Sideshow and Janus Films have acquired the North American rights to “The Eight Mountains,” a drama by Belgian filmmakers Felix van Groeningen and Charlotte Vandermeersch that won the Grand Jury Prize at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. The companies, which teamed up to release Cannes and Oscar-winning “Drive My Car” last year, plan to release […]]]>

Sideshow and Janus Films have acquired the North American rights to “The Eight Mountains,” a drama by Belgian filmmakers Felix van Groeningen and Charlotte Vandermeersch that won the Grand Jury Prize at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

The companies, which teamed up to release Cannes and Oscar-winning “Drive My Car” last year, plan to release the film in theaters later this year.

Based on Paolo Cognetti’s novel, ‘The Eight Mountains’ was written and directed by van Groeningen and Vandermeersch, whose ‘The Broken Circle Breakdown’ was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film (now Best International Feature Film ) in 2013. Van Groeningen co-wrote and directed this film, and Vandermeersh collaborated on the screenplay. This is her first film as a director.

The film spans three decades and stars Luca Marinelli and Alessandro Borghi as two men whose childhood encounters turn into a lifelong friendship, largely in the Italian Alpine village of Aosta. It is van Groeningen’s first film in Italian, a language he and Vandermeersh learned specifically to make the film. His previous films are in Flemish, Dutch and English (2018 “Beautiful Boy”).

“We admire Sideshow/Janus Films for their exquisite taste and talent for bringing the world’s most special films to a wide audience,” van Groeningen and Vandermeersch said in a statement announcing the acquisition. “We believe we have found the perfect home for our film and know this story will breathe air into the lives of people around the world.”

For their part, the distributors’ statement called “The Eight Mountains” “a radical and deeply moving film about friendship filled with heart and featuring terrific performances from Luca Marinelli and Alessandro Borghi” and added, “We are thrilled to collaborate with Felix van Groeningen, Charlotte Vandermeersch, Mario Giannani and Lorenzo Gangarossa to bring this special film to North America.

The deal was brokered by CAA Media Finance and Vision Distribution on behalf of the filmmakers.

Cannes Film Festival 2022 portrait gallery (exclusive photos)

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The Cannes Film Festival calls for the release of Iranian filmmakers https://cannesfest.org/the-cannes-film-festival-calls-for-the-release-of-iranian-filmmakers/ Mon, 11 Jul 2022 20:29:22 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/the-cannes-film-festival-calls-for-the-release-of-iranian-filmmakers/ The Cannes Film Festival has called for the immediate release of filmmakers Mohammad Rasoulof, Mostafa Alehahmad and Jafar Panahi, detained by Iran for the past few days. In a statement released on Monday, Cannes organizers said: “The Cannes Film Festival strongly condemns these arrests as well as the wave of repression evidently underway in Iran […]]]>

The Cannes Film Festival has called for the immediate release of filmmakers Mohammad Rasoulof, Mostafa Alehahmad and Jafar Panahi, detained by Iran for the past few days.

In a statement released on Monday, Cannes organizers said: “The Cannes Film Festival strongly condemns these arrests as well as the wave of repression evidently underway in Iran against its artists.”

Panahi, which has won numerous awards including the Golden Leopard at the Locarno Festival, the Golden Lion at Venice and the Silver Bear at the Berlinale, was arrested on Monday while protesting against the detention of two other award-winning filmmakers, Mohammad Rasoulof and Mostafa Alehhmad.

The Berlinale, the European Film Academy and the International Coalition for Filmmakers at Risk have also spoken out against their arrest.

“We are deeply concerned about the arrests of Mohammad Rasoulof and Mostafa Al-Ahmad. It is shocking that artists are being arrested for their peaceful efforts against violence,” Berlinale organizers said.

Rasoulof – another top filmmaker with several international awards such as the Golden Bear – and Alehahmad – who is known at international film galas for his short films — were arrested on July 8 as part of Iran repression against the signatories of a collective declaration entitled “Lay down the gun» issued by more than 100 film industry personalities at the end of May.

The statement called on the military and security forces which “have become tools to repress the people”, not to repress the protesters during a wave of protests across Iran that was sparked when a 10-storey building collapsed in Abadan, leaving at least 40 people dead and dozens missing.

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A UC student takes part in the Cannes Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/a-uc-student-takes-part-in-the-cannes-film-festival/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 15:06:18 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/a-uc-student-takes-part-in-the-cannes-film-festival/ Srivastava went to the first week of the two-week festival, which was filled with film premieres, networking and award ceremonies. Amid the glitz and glamor of celebrity sightings and red carpet events, Srivastava said her goal is to meet other producers and friends from the film industry. That hasn’t stopped him from clashing with famous […]]]>

Srivastava went to the first week of the two-week festival, which was filled with film premieres, networking and award ceremonies.

Amid the glitz and glamor of celebrity sightings and red carpet events, Srivastava said her goal is to meet other producers and friends from the film industry. That hasn’t stopped him from clashing with famous personalities, including this year’s honorary Palme d’Or winner, Forest Whitaker.

“I opened the door and [Whitaker was] right there,” Srivastava recounted. “I shook his hand, of course, and gave him my card. Took her hand, had a good conversation for about a minute. [The Cannes Film Festival] is the place where we can meet and talk to these people, because otherwise they are inaccessible.

Another highlight of the event for Srivastava was that his home country, India, was named an official country of honor at the Simultaneous Film Market, the festival’s official marketplace for networking, conferences and previews of projects.

“It was a big event because we had businessmen, producers and actors from my country, everyone,” Srivastava said. “I had a lot of appointments at the film market, it kept me busy… Coming from India and seeing it with such a lens was a very proud moment for me.”

Srivastava noted that he spends most of his time in the market meeting with Indian government officials, composers and other filmmakers. Throughout the week, he was able to forge links with new collaborators and represent his country with pride.

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Elvis review: Baz Luhrmann shakes up the Cannes Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/elvis-review-baz-luhrmann-shakes-up-the-cannes-film-festival/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 17:03:16 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/elvis-review-baz-luhrmann-shakes-up-the-cannes-film-festival/ CANNES, France — Elvis Presley never had the overseas touring career he deserved. He only played at three venues outside the United States, all of them in Canada in 1957, long before he reached the pinnacle of stardom. Instead of going international, he remained a fixture at the International Hotel in Las Vegas from 1969 […]]]>

Elvis Presley never had the overseas touring career he deserved. He only played at three venues outside the United States, all of them in Canada in 1957, long before he reached the pinnacle of stardom. Instead of going international, he remained a fixture at the International Hotel in Las Vegas from 1969 to 1976, performing show after sold-out show until just a year before his death. Keeping Presley tied to Vegas was just one of the many machinations of his ruthlessly exploitative manager, Colonel Tom Parkerwho was widely believed to have been afraid to leave the United States after immigrating there illegally from the Netherlands years earlier.

This sad story is unpacked in great detail in ‘Elvis’, Baz Luhrmann’s unsurprisingly extravagant new film about the life, art and career of Presley, which had its world premiere last month at the Cannes Film Festival and will be released in US theaters on Friday. Presley may never have had the opportunity to perform for his fans in France, but Cannes gladly rolled out the red carpet for Luhrmann and his stars, Austin Butler, who makes a believable charismatic Elvis, and Tom Hanks, who makes Colonel Parker every inch of himself. – service bastard. Defensive and self-pity, Parker tells this long, wacky tale of a king and his kingmaker, arguing – halfheartedly – ​​that he’s not the villain that history has made him out to be.

The problem is that if Parker is really the villain of “Elvis”, Luhrmann has also gone out of his way to make him a co-protagonist. I usually like it when Hanks cuts against the grain of the good guy, but his work here is hammered, raspy, and unmodulated to the fault, accomplished with a combination of greasy suiting, prosthetic jowls, and over-the-top accent that makes The Penguin by Colin Farrell and Stellan Skarsgard’s Baron Von Harkonnen look positively restrained. It also adds unnecessary narrative padding to a film that runs north of 2.5 hours and would gain more time if it didn’t repeatedly force its ostensible subject to share its spotlight.

Tom Hanks in the movie “Elvis”.

(Photos by Warner Bros.)

It’s a shame, because in many other ways, “Elvis” feels like an intuitive and sometimes even ideal match between filmmaker and subject. Luhrmann doesn’t do much by halves, and here his flamboyant stylistic excesses are right on par with those of Elvis. Performance footage crackles with wired energy, even when Luhrmann pulls them or even slows them down. (A blissful opening scene of a glamorous young Elvis shaking a crowd of women—and unleashing wave after wave of pink pelvic gyrations—seems to go on forever.) At times, Luhrmann will play the concert footage in sizzling black-and-white; sometimes it will divide the screen not into quadrants but into octants. It’s a bit too much, which means it’s fair.

Butler is a decent physical match for Elvis and a better vocal one. While it’s often the real Presley you hear singing in the film, the soundtrack is also replete with Butler’s recorded covers of “I’ll Fly Away”, “Blue Suede Shoes”, “Heartbreak Hotel”, “Hound Dog and “I Can’t Help Falling In Love”, among others. Efforts were made early on to locate Elvis’ musical and spiritual origins in the churches and revival tents of Mississippi, and also to confront his often disputed legacy as a performer and appropriator of black music.Key black artists seen briefly here include BB King (Kelvin Harrison Jr.), Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup (Gary Clark Jr.), Sister Rosetta Tharpe ( Yola), Little Richard (Alton Mason) and Big Mama Thornton (Shonka Dukureh).

Before long, Colonel Parker realizes the bottomless commercial potential of an artist who could “sell a black sound with a white face,” as Presley described in Eugene Jarecki’s excellent 2018 documentary, “The king.” This film clearly drew a parallel between the waste and decadence of Presley’s ignominious final years and the moral complacency and confusion of Trump’s America. By contrast, Luhrmann’s “Elvis” largely keeps politics and larger metaphors at bay; it merely tells a conventional, crowd-pleasing tale of the rise and fall of an iconic performer.

And so we see the triumphs of Elvis’ career, his meteoric rise to the top of the charts and his proud defiance of the conservative squares who tried to keep his evil dancing in check. We see his tumultuous marriage to Priscilla (a likeable Olivia DeJonge); his neglect of his daughter, Lisa Marie; and his years of struggling with addiction and depression, most of which take place in a sprawling Vegas penthouse suite that feels more like a prison with every shot. Complaining that “Elvis” is essentially a compilation of biographical musical conventions is a bit like complaining about a greatest hits album; it also lacks one of Luhrmann’s strengths as a filmmaker, which is his ability to imbue shots with sincerity, energy and sentiment.

These gifts were on display inexorably in Luhrmann’s ‘Moulin Rouge’, which kicked off the 2001 festival in style. It was the first edition of Cannes programmed by its longtime artistic director, Thierry Frémaux, and the opening night selection of the “Moulin Rouge” was a major blow that improved relations between the festival and Hollywood. , who had become somewhat reluctant in the 90s. bring studio films to the Croisette. Luhrmann would return to open the 2013 festival with “Gatsby the magnificent,” which, like most of the opening night films, was forgotten within days but nonetheless felt like an ideal starter for an event where art, commerce, glamor and silliness exist in a balance almost perfect. To that end, “Elvis” wouldn’t have been a bad Cannes opening pick this year, though I suspect Warner Bros., which has high hopes for the film when it comes out, wanted to avoid the harsher critical scrutiny that often comes with an opening night.

‘Elvis’

Evaluation: PG-13

When: Open Friday

Where: wide version

Operating time: 2 hours, 39 minutes

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Joyland’s Alina Khan on winning the Cannes Film Festival as a trans Pakistani actor https://cannesfest.org/joylands-alina-khan-on-winning-the-cannes-film-festival-as-a-trans-pakistani-actor/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 09:04:11 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/joylands-alina-khan-on-winning-the-cannes-film-festival-as-a-trans-pakistani-actor/ Now, more than two decades later, the actress believes her vision is coming to fruition. Khan began her acting career in 2019 with Saddiq’s short film Sweetheart, which also achieved international acclaim, winning the Orizzonti Award for Best Short Film at the 2019 Venice Film Festival. Determined to grow as an actor, Khan continued to […]]]>

Now, more than two decades later, the actress believes her vision is coming to fruition. Khan began her acting career in 2019 with Saddiq’s short film Sweetheart, which also achieved international acclaim, winning the Orizzonti Award for Best Short Film at the 2019 Venice Film Festival. Determined to grow as an actor, Khan continued to feature in small commercials and other short films until that has joyland happened in 2021.”joylandWinning at Cannes means so much to me because I’m playing a trans dancer in the film – the same identity that I’ve been shunned my whole life earned us this award,” Khan says, adding that she sees parts of herself in Biba . Throughout our conversation, she points out that a trans actor playing the character of Biba is monumental because so often cis actors are cast and cast to play trans roles.

When Saddiq explained Biba’s personality to Khan, she immediately understood the anger that fueled the character’s passion to succeed as a performer and diva.nazakāt » (Urdu for elegance) with which it would command attention. In the film, when Biba’s community encourages her to join their protest for trans rights, she adamantly refuses to participate and says she would gain respect through her fame – this mimics Khan’s own experience of want to prove their worth through accomplishments.

“My family always thought I would put them to shame, only Ammi spoke to me for a few minutes while the others cut me off. Now they are actually proud of my success and that makes me the happiest,” Khan says, still brutally aware that she is far from accepted. In 2018, Pakistan’s parliament passed the Transgender People (Protection of Rights) Act which allows trans people to identify themselves on national identity documents and criminalizes discrimination in the workplace. Earlier this year, the Sindh government in Pakistan also allocated a 0.5% quota for trans people to get jobs in the government sector. Although these efforts suggest integration, violence against the trans community in the country continues to rise. According to the nonprofit Trans-Action Alliance, since 2015 more than 91 trans women have been murdered in Khyber Pakthunkhwa province alone.

Alina Khan and director Saim Sadiq attend the ‘Joyland’ photocall during the 75th Cannes Film Festival

Daniele Venturelli

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Mehwish Hayat reveals that his film was screened at the Cannes Film Festival. https://cannesfest.org/mehwish-hayat-reveals-that-his-film-was-screened-at-the-cannes-film-festival/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 21:43:51 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/mehwish-hayat-reveals-that-his-film-was-screened-at-the-cannes-film-festival/ Mehwish Hayat reveals that his film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival. Mehwish Hayat walked the red carpet at the premiere of Ms. Marvel, her first Hollywood film. She starred in the TV movie Dho Dala, which premiered in Cannes 12 years ago. Mehwish is currently promoting his film London Nahi Jaunga. Mehwish Hayat is […]]]>

Mehwish Hayat reveals that his film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival.

  • Mehwish Hayat walked the red carpet at the premiere of Ms. Marvel, her first Hollywood film.
  • She starred in the TV movie Dho Dala, which premiered in Cannes 12 years ago.
  • Mehwish is currently promoting his film London Nahi Jaunga.

Mehwish Hayat is a Pakistani actress, best known for her leading performances in the comedies Actor in Law, Punjab Nahi Jaungi, Load Wedding and Chhalawa, all of which are among Pakistan’s highest-grossing films.

She previously received the Lux Style Award and the Tamgha-e-Imtiaz from the Pakistani government in 2019.

Pakistani productions and performers have been very successful this year, crossing international borders and providing new opportunities for emerging talent.

A Pakistani film was the first to be exhibited and win top honors at the Cannes Film Festival. Many performers such as Humayun Saeed, Mehwish Hayat and Ahad Raza Mir have appeared in major productions with notable and essential parts. Ms. Marvel will include Mehwish in the near future.

Read more: Sara Ali Khan shares a beautiful family photo on Father’s Day

She starred in the TV movie Dho Dala, directed by Iram Parveen Bilal, which premiered in Cannes 12 years ago. At the time, Mehwish was unable to attend the famous film festival.

She’s doing great these days though, having just walked the red carpet at the premiere of Ms. Marvel, her first Hollywood film. Mehwish is now promoting his film London Nahi Jaunga, which is how this information came to light.

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An independent filmmaker’s strategic guide to working the Cannes Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/an-independent-filmmakers-strategic-guide-to-working-the-cannes-film-festival/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 16:14:52 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/an-independent-filmmakers-strategic-guide-to-working-the-cannes-film-festival/ Cannes marketing materials I’m a New Orleans-based writer-director working on a follow-up feature to my movie laundry day. In 2021, I hooked up executive producer Corky Kessler and raised money to attend Sundance for the first time (I know, I know… late) with him as my de facto host. Of course, Sundance was canceled at […]]]>
Cannes marketing materials

I’m a New Orleans-based writer-director working on a follow-up feature to my movie laundry day. In 2021, I hooked up executive producer Corky Kessler and raised money to attend Sundance for the first time (I know, I know… late) with him as my de facto host. Of course, Sundance was canceled at the last minute, and I lost a lot of money and what I thought was a hope of being around people who can help my new project, drink musicbe done on a substantial budget (my first seven-figure film).

A few months later, a colleague asked me if I was going to Cannes. Never having considered this as an option, I sneered but out of curiosity asked on Twitter. Director Editor and producer Scott Macaulay replied, “Apples to apples, going to Cannes is cheaper than going to SXSW” and walked me through the intricacies of festival spending. Free admission…if you qualify. To my amazement, I qualified. With the remaining money, I was off to Cannes! I wanted to attend the Market specifically and meet foreign salespeople and financiers. The goal was to understand their needs and see if (down the road) my project can meet those needs.

I prepared a pitch deck, a poster and a sheet. I also tried to complete “ripomatic”/”sizzle reel” but ran out of time. (It turned out that I didn’t need any of that at the festival itself, but I was glad I finished the material and was waiting at home when I got back, exhausted.)

For the first time, I used three strategies, each a version of the “brute force” / “turning every stone” approach.

First, I spent the previous month digging through Cannes’ Cinando database, sorting through relevant people and finance companies, and cold-contacting with an introduction to myself and the project. This allowed me to have about 15 appointments scheduled.

Second strategy: meet financiers at the Market. It was an instant failure because from day one it became clear that the Market is where the sellers are, not the buyers.

The third strategy was to attend as many parties and mixes as possible and meet people. On Day 3, I ran into a friend, Ben Weisner of Vanishing Angle, and he explained to me that the financiers and sales agents had moved into the hotels looking for balcony banners. This revelation allowed me to pivot Strategy 2 to a new approach:

– take pictures of all the balconies of the hotel.
– research each company. Sort by relevance. Get the list of staff so I can visually identify people when I enter the offices.
– go to his office. Ask to speak to the boss/owner. Give them a verbal pitch, then ask them what they would need to be interested.

Surprisingly, this approach allowed me to have one-on-one interviews with the owners or bosses of 12 out of 16 companies, because they were right there and I only asked for a few minutes of their time. I guess it must be a unique type of event in Cannes. During these meetings, I learned a lot about overseas sales financing, the myriad models of corporate financing, and which companies are relevant for which project scenarios. For example, company X only makes the last third of the budget, company Y only co-finances when a film is half-financed, company Z will finance up to 50% of the budget in exchange for the video rights at residence in England, etc. and to infinity. After the interviews, I wrote the main takeaways on their business card or catalog for further processing.

I made sure to get direct contact details for each of them so if/when I return I won’t have to deal with middle managers or gatekeepers.

Overall the best prospects for short term funding were the relationships I met while socializing – having Corky there was very helpful in this regard – although the Cinando meetings resulted in two very solid.

My mantra is, “A few high-quality leads are better than a lot of low-quality leads.” Considering Memorial Day and the short week after it, I waited two weeks to start tracking, and used that time to prioritize leads. So now I’ve been following and using the wait to implement notes on my script and think about the millions of funding scenarios now laid before me. My top priority is to protect the integrity of the project, so I’m assembling a team of New Orleans producers to manage relationships with these potential funding sources. Only time will tell how this all plays out, so fingers crossed.

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6 best performances at the 2022 Cannes Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/6-best-performances-at-the-2022-cannes-film-festival/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/6-best-performances-at-the-2022-cannes-film-festival/ Last month, on the sunny shores of the Côte d’Azur, the Cannes Film Festival celebrated its 75th edition from May 17 to 28. After two years of downsizing in the face of the global pandemic, Cannes rebounded this year with its usual sense of enthusiastic hype surrounding the premieres of some of the most important […]]]>

Last month, on the sunny shores of the Côte d’Azur, the Cannes Film Festival celebrated its 75th edition from May 17 to 28. After two years of downsizing in the face of the global pandemic, Cannes rebounded this year with its usual sense of enthusiastic hype surrounding the premieres of some of the most important new films from all corners of the world.



RELATED: From ‘Elvis’ to ‘Top Gun: Maverick’: 10 Best Movies That Premiered At Cannes Film Festival 2022

A variety of dramatic and experimental new cinematic works at this year’s edition of Cannes provided many showcases of talent from some of the world’s most influential actors and actresses, and these were some of the best.

6 donkeys in HEY

When Isabelle Huppertaka the “French Meryl Streep”, appeared in a diminutive three-quarter role by Jerzy Skolimowski new movie HEY, patrons at each showing gasped in elated surprise. However, Huppert’s immense fame was not enough to divert attention from HE the most incredible performances; the six real donkeys representing the main character of the film.

HEYan experimental and audacious remake of the 1966 French film Random balthazar, delights Cannes this year with its fascinating visual approach. The film’s narrative centers on a former circus donkey and his cruel journeys through modern Europe as he passes from owner to owner. The film is almost devoid of dialogue, allowing the audience to think about the donkey’s perspective without completely anthropomorphizing its animal perspective. As an epic animal tale, the six donkeys playing EO enchanted the film with the unique cinematic qualities of horses and other equines. When HEY received the jury prize at Cannes this year, director Skolimowski did not fail to thank the six donkeys who gave life to the protagonist of his film.


Austin Butler in Elvis

Millennials can recognize Austin Butler’s numerous roles on children’s television from the early 2000s. This year at Cannes, the thirty-year-old actor cemented his status as a Hollywood star with his starring role as “King of Rock N Roll” in Elvis. In by Baz Luhrmann latest exercise in over-the-top filmmaking, Butler’s standout performance as a Elvis Presley balances a film that ambitiously pushes the boundaries of spectacle with mixed success.

RELATED: ‘Elvis’: Austin Butler Shows Off His Voice in Behind-the-Scenes Clip

Elvis chronicles Presley’s rise to international stardom, with Butler portraying the singer throughout several decades of his illustrious career. Butler’s incarnation of ‘The King’ is handled with expertise so detailed it’s enough to upgrade Elvis above just an excessive biopic. With the difficult task of portraying a celebrity such as Presley with such an iconic figure in popular culture, Butler skillfully captures Presley’s speaking and singing voices and captivating stage presence.


Song Kang-ho in Broker

During his last appearance at the Cannes Film Festival in 2019, the South Korean actor Song Kang-ho the most famous performance debuted in the Palme d’Or Parasite. This year, Song returned to Cannes with his latest work, Broker, a Korean-language film by a Japanese director Hirokazu Kore-eda. Song became the first South Korean actor to win Best Actor at Cannes in the festival’s 75-year history.

RELATED: Ruben Östlund’s ‘Triangle of Sadness’ Acquired by Neon at Cannes

Known for its social realism dramas, Kore-eda Broker adheres to the filmmaker’s work but leaves his native Japan for South Korea. As one of Broker, Song plays Sang-hyeon, a laundromat owner who plots with a friend to kidnap unwanted babies left in a church “baby box” to sell the children on the black market for adoption. As Song has proven in his collaborations with filmmakers such as Bong Joon Ho and Park Chan-wook, the talented actor can embody imperfect characters towards whom the spectator can feel a feeling of attachment and contradictory sensibility. Audiences will experience Song’s award-winning Best Actor performance at Cannes as Broker as the film releases worldwide this year, with Neon handling the US distribution of Broker.


Vicky Krieps in Bodice

Since her breakout role in 2017 as Alma in ghost yarnactress Vicky Krieps impressed with his skills and affinity for casting quality roles. This year in Cannes, Krieps received the interpretation prize in the Un Certain Regard section of the festival for his last role in Bodice. Directed by Austrian filmmaker Marie Kreutzer, Bodice is an ambitious period drama centered on the revisionist history of Empress Elisabeth of Austria, one of the most influential European aristocrats of the late 19th century.

Krieps skillfully embodies the anarchist spirit of the king. The character of Elisabeth is portrayed as discordant with her husband, of Emperor Franz Joseph, ideas about how a woman in power should feel and behave. However, Kriep’s spirited performance doesn’t erase Elisabeth’s shortcomings; the Empress was known for her indulgent demeanor and unpredictability as she navigated the boredom of aristocratic life.


Margaret Qualley in The stars at noon

In Cannes this year, Claire Dennis‘ last movie, The stars at noon, premiered to mixed reviews from journalists and moviegoers. Based on a novel of the same name set in the final years of the Nicaraguan Revolution, Denis chose to update The stars at noon for modern times in a world in the age of the pandemic. Unfortunately, the public scrutinizes The stars at noon for its meandering narrative approach and confusing political messages. Regardless of the film’s tangled themes, a major highlight was the budding actress’ performance. Margaret Qualley.

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Qualley stars as Trish, an American journalist with mysterious origins and motivations working in Nicaragua during a turbulent presidential election. Trish’s visa allowing her to work in the country was revoked for reasons not fully explained, leaving her trapped in Nicaragua. As she wanders erratically, planning her next move, Trish falls in love with a British businessman (Joe Alwyn). The two embark on a plan to escape Nicaragua while falling into a twisted romance of desperation in a country they both don’t belong to. As Trish, Qualley delivers a remarkable performance as a desperate young woman whose actions and reactions leave her simultaneously unbearable and pathetic. A24 will distribute The stars at noon in the United States later this year.


Michelle Williams in To show up

michelle williams received a lot of praise at Cannes this year for his latest role in To show uprealized by Kelly Reichard. In her fourth collaboration with the American auteur filmmaker, Williams stars as Lizzy Carr, an aspiring sculptor living in modern-day Portland, where the character faces creative crises leading to her biggest art exposure yet. day.

As with Reichardt’s other works, To show up has a quiet, unhurried sensibility that contemplates modern American life. As Lizzy, Williams tactically delivers a performance that evokes reality in a way that fits in with Reichardt’s down-to-earth work. Williams’ interpretation is a fully realized artist who juggles doubt in her creative process and feelings of inferiority alongside the daily stressors of life. In all, To show up is another outstanding work by Reichardt that perfectly showcases Williams’ remarkable talents.

NEXT: From ‘Love’ to ‘Triangle of Sadness’: Every Palme d’Or Winner of the Last Decade (And How to Watch Them)

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Celebrities at the 2022 Cannes Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/celebrities-at-the-2022-cannes-film-festival/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/celebrities-at-the-2022-cannes-film-festival/ The Cannes Film Festival has come to an end after celebrities and film industry professionals flocked to the beautiful French Riviera to celebrate recently released films and showcase new ones. The annual festival, now in its 75th year, began on May 17 and ended on May 28, with Virginie Efira as mistress of the opening […]]]>

The Cannes Film Festival has come to an end after celebrities and film industry professionals flocked to the beautiful French Riviera to celebrate recently released films and showcase new ones. The annual festival, now in its 75th year, began on May 17 and ended on May 28, with Virginie Efira as mistress of the opening and closing ceremonies.

This year’s festival saw a wide variety of films compete for the legendary Palme d’Or, which in the past has helped films like ‘Parasite’ achieve resounding success. This year, particular excitement has bubbled up around everything from David Cronenberg’s body-horror hallucination “Crimes of the Future,” starring Kristen Stewart, to Baz Luhrmann’s “Elvis,” which stars Austin Butler as major. Other planned releases include Tom Cruise’s “Top Gun: Maverick” and the actor also received a tribute. The Palme d’or 2022 was finally awarded to “Triangle of Sadness” by Ruben Östlund, a satire on the dark side of capitalism.

Cannes is notable for attracting some of the biggest names in entertainment and fashion, and this year stars like Eva Longoria, Lori Harvey, Viola Davis, Adriana Lima and more all made glamorous appearances. Elle Fanning and Lashana Lynch also made waves for their dazzling looks, and icons like Kristen Stewart and Emily Ratajkowski also made memorable appearances. Read the best moments of the Cannes Film Festival 2022 in advance.

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