Film festival – Cannes Fest http://cannesfest.org/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 06:08:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cannesfest.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png Film festival – Cannes Fest http://cannesfest.org/ 32 32 What to watch at the Melbourne International Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/what-to-watch-at-the-melbourne-international-film-festival/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 06:08:29 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/what-to-watch-at-the-melbourne-international-film-festival/ The Melbourne International Film Festival returns this week and – thanks to COVID-19 – it’s the event’s first full live season in three years. This is also its historic 70th edition, which explains why this year’s festival program is so packed: 257 feature films, 102 short films and 12 XR plays make up MIFF 2022, […]]]>

The Melbourne International Film Festival returns this week and – thanks to COVID-19 – it’s the event’s first full live season in three years.

This is also its historic 70th edition, which explains why this year’s festival program is so packed: 257 feature films, 102 short films and 12 XR plays make up MIFF 2022, and this worrying amount also includes 18 premieres. worldwide in its number.

Having such a packed schedule also means it’s extremely difficult to narrow down movies, but we tried anyway. Below are The boastfulThe best movies to check out at MIFF 2022, including an intriguing work produced by the Safdie brothers and a coming-of-age drama starring a certain popular Normal People star.

The 2022 Melbourne International Film Festival runs from Thursday August 4 to Saturday August 21. Find the full program and ticketing information at official site.

For more on this topic, follow the Film & TV Observer.

Produced by the Safdie brothers, this black comedy follows a teenage cartoonist, Robert, who wishes to escape his banal suburban life in search of artistic glory. After a traumatic event, Robert decides to drop out of school to live in a terribly small apartment, where he meets Wallace, someone who could help him achieve his dreams.

Funny Pages received a short standing ovation at Cannes earlier this year, and there’s some interesting talent behind the camera: the film is written and directed by Owen Kline, who played a memorable role in one of the notable early films. by Noah Baumbach The squid and the whale (he also happens to be the son of Hollywood stars Kevin Kline and Phoebe Cates); it was shot on Super 16mm by Sean Price Williams, who handled cinematography for arthouse filmmakers like Alex Ross Perry (Listen Philip, His smell).

With Paul Mescal, normal people actor, partner of Phoebe Bridgers, and obsessive figure for a little interminable online installment, this film also happens to have received near unanimous positive reviews.

The Irish actor plays a young father, Calum, who goes on a summer vacation to Turkey with his eleven-year-old daughter, Sophie. It’s not until she’s much older – and with the help of MiniDV footage – that she realizes the person she thought her father was isn’t the man she knew.

After last year’s romantic drama The worst person in the world, Norwegian cinema has a little moment. Directed by up-and-coming filmmaker Kristoffer Borgli, sick of me aims to capitalize on the spirit of the times in 2022.

The darker than dark satire details the extremely unhealthy competitive relationship between a young couple, Signe and Thomas. After the latter finally achieves his breakthrough as an artist, Signe does everything she can to put the focus back on her, including devouring dangerous pills. As The Hollywood Reporter review said it, Sick of Myself is “horrifyingly, shamefully, hilarious to tell… A vicious little treat to savor.”

Ah, Y2K: Depending on who you ask, it was either a wonderful time or a terrible time for fashion, but it was also a seminal time for the indie rock and garage revival.

Centered around New York’s Lower East Side, bands like The Strokes, Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Interpol helped resurrect the city’s cultural scene after 9/11.

Directors Dylan Southern and Will Lovelace take viewers back to the days of super skinny jeans and greasy hair in this detailed documentary. Featuring never-before-seen footage and interviews with names like Karen O and Albert Hammond Jr., this one’s for the millennial music fan in your life.

For his breakout year in 1993 with The piano and jurassic park, Sam Neill starred in this film shot in Melbourne, based on a comic novel of the same name. For MIFF 2022, it has undergone a brand new restoration, a deserved honor for a classic Australian cinema.

Set in – you guessed it – Brunswick, Neill plays Carl, an unlucky man who lacks meaning in life. He takes a job as a chef in an underdog pub to make ends meet, where he soon falls head over heels in love with bartender Sophie. When he finds himself implicated in the death of a cook, he causes trouble between the local Greek and Turkish communities.

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RO Metronom production wins Jerusalem Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/ro-metronom-production-wins-jerusalem-film-festival/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 11:42:57 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/ro-metronom-production-wins-jerusalem-film-festival/ Alexandru Belc’s first feature film Metronome received the Nechama Rivilin Award for Best International Film at this year’s Jerusalem Film Festival. This spring, the film won the Best Director award at Belc in the Un Certain Regard section of the Cannes Film Festival. The jury hailed the film as “a penetrating cinematic portrait of youth […]]]>

Alexandru Belc’s first feature film Metronome received the Nechama Rivilin Award for Best International Film at this year’s Jerusalem Film Festival.

This spring, the film won the Best Director award at Belc in the Un Certain Regard section of the Cannes Film Festival.

The jury hailed the film as “a penetrating cinematic portrait of youth under an oppressive regime. The film’s unique power lies in its sharpness and personal point of view.

The jury for the international competition was composed of Mariette Rissenbeek, László Nemes and Rúnar Rúnarsson.

Also in the International Competition section, a special mention was awarded to Pablo Schils for his performance in Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne Tori and Lokita.

Eleven films entered the international competition section of the festival, including Park Chan-wook’s Decision to leaveMia Hansen-Love’s A nice morningand Hirokazu Kore-eda Broker.

Metronome tells the story of a group of friends who decide to send a letter to Metronom, the musical program that Radio Free Europe broadcasts clandestinely in Romania.

The film stars Mara Bugarin, Şerban Lazarovici, Mara Vicol, Vlad Ivanov, Mihai Călin and Andreea Bibiri.

(Photo: Metronom Facebook page)

simona@romania-insider.com

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Mads Mikkelsen comes to the 28th Sarajevo Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/mads-mikkelsen-comes-to-the-28th-sarajevo-film-festival/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 10:30:02 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/mads-mikkelsen-comes-to-the-28th-sarajevo-film-festival/ Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen will be a guest at the 28th Sarajevo Film Festival this year. On August 14, the Sarajevo Film Festival will screen THE HUNT – in which Mikkelsen plays the lead role – at the Coca-Cola Open Air Cinema. Mikkelsen will receive the Honorary Heart of Sarajevo for his contribution to the […]]]>

Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen will be a guest at the 28th Sarajevo Film Festival this year. On August 14, the Sarajevo Film Festival will screen THE HUNT – in which Mikkelsen plays the lead role – at the Coca-Cola Open Air Cinema. Mikkelsen will receive the Honorary Heart of Sarajevo for his contribution to the art of cinema before the screening. The Danish actor originally received this recognition during the 26th Sarajevo Film Festival (2020), but was unable to attend in person due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Mads Mikkelsen was born in 1965 in Denmark. He was educated at the Aarhus Theater Drama School. The Copenhagen-born actor began his professional career as a gymnast and dancer, and worked steadily in theatre, television and film to become the top male star in Denmark and Scandinavia. Mikkelsen made his film debut in 1996, with a lead performance in director Nicolas Winding Refn’s international hit crime drama PUSHER, the first part of a trilogy. He reprized his role as a low-life pusher/junkie in the highly anticipated sequel, WITH BLOOD ON MY HANDS: PUSHER 2. This performance earned him a “Best Actor” Robert statue from the Danish Film Academy and a “Best Actor” Bodil Award from the National Association of Danish Film Critics.

In 2006, Mikkelsen starred as the villain Le Cipher in the 2006 James Bond film CASINO ROYALE. The film was positively received by critics and grossed over $594 million worldwide, claiming the title of highest-grossing James Bond film. Also that year, Mikkelsen played the lead role in the Oscar-nominated film AFTER THE WEDDING, directed by Academy Award-winning director Susanne Bier. In 2009, he reunited with Danish director Nicolas Winding Refn for VALHALLA RISING. The film premiered at the 66th Venice International Film Festival. In 2010, he starred as Draco in the 3D fantasy adventure film CLASH OF THE TITANS. The film was directed by Louis Leterrier and distributed by Warner Brothers. In 2011, Mikkelsen starred as Rochefort in the 3D adaptation of THREE MUSKETEERS, directed by Paul WS Anderson. Mikkelsen also starred in the Oscar-nominated film A ROYAL AFFAIR as Johann Friedrich Struensee, the German doctor who became a confidant of the mentally ill King Christian VII and had an affair with his wife, the Queen. Caroline Matilda. The landmark film, written and directed by Nikolaj Arcel, premiered in competition at the 62nd Berlin International Film Festival in February 2012 and the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival. At the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, Mads Mikkelsen received the best actor award for his role in LA CHASE by Thomas Vinterberg. Mikkelsen plays a kindergarten teacher in a small Danish village who is falsely accused of child abuse. After premiering at Cannes, the film screened at the 2012 Telluride Film Festival, the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival, and was released by Magnolia Pictures in the spring of 2013.

Mikkelsen also co-starred in THE NECESSARY DEATH OF CHARLIE COUNTRYMAN as Nigel, a violent crime boss. Directed by Fredrik Bond, the film premiered in January 2013 at the Sundance Film Festival and screened in competition at the 63rd Berlin International Film Festival in February 2013.

Mads Mikkelsen is best known for the series HANNIBAL (2013-2015), developed by Bryan Fuller for NBC. In the series, Mikkelsen plays the accomplished psychologist and sociopathic serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter, who is based on the character from the classic Thomas Harris novels. Mikkelsen’s work received special recognition when he was named a member of the prestigious 2016 Cannes Film Festival Jury. In 2016, he starred in ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY and the Marvel film DR. ODD. In 2017, he shot the thriller ARCTIC where he played the main role. The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2018. Mikkelsen starred in the adaptation of the graphic novel POLAR, directed by Jonas Åkerlund, released in 2019 by Netflix.

Most recently, Mads Mikkelsen starred in Thomas Vinterberg’s ANOTHER ROUND, which won an Oscar® for Best International Feature Film 2021.

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Discover new award-winning feature films at the Motovun Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/discover-new-award-winning-feature-films-at-the-motovun-film-festival/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 14:00:39 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/discover-new-award-winning-feature-films-at-the-motovun-film-festival/ Every summer, the Motovun Film Festival brings thousands of moviegoers to a historic hilltop village in the heart of Istria for open-air screenings in the main square, presentations and lots of parties. This year is in full swing and runs until Saturday, July 30. Some 20 major feature films and dozens of short films […]]]>

Every summer, the Motovun Film Festival brings thousands of moviegoers to a historic hilltop village in the heart of Istria for open-air screenings in the main square, presentations and lots of parties. This year is in full swing and runs until Saturday, July 30.

Some 20 major feature films and dozens of short films are screened against the atmospheric backdrop of Motovun’s main square and quaint little cinemas. Among the highlights are sky boyan Egyptian drama set in a prestigious theological college involving a religious and political power struggle, and Dress of Gems, a missing person mystery in which three women from the Mexican countryside fight against a cartel. Both films were released this year and both won awards at top European festivals, respectively a best screenplay award at Cannes and a silver bear in Berlin.

Also pay attention to war pony, another 2022 release and winner of Best Debut at Cannes, a coming-of-age tale that follows two Lakota boys as they search for meaning on a reservation in South Dakota. Recently winner of the Oscar for best documentary, soul summer (2021) features the seminal festival that took place in Harlem in 1969, largely ignored at the time with all the hype surrounding Woodstock.


With Sweden as this year’s partner nation, Ingmar Bergman’s groundbreaking psychological drama Character (1966) is screened, featuring a young nurse and her patient actress isolated in a cottage by the sea whose personalities begin to merge.

Inaugurated in 1999, the Motovun Film Festival originally aimed to highlight the works of small studios and independent filmmakers in Croatia. Over the years it has become a prestigious international showcase, attracting filmmakers such as Paul Thomas Anderson and Ken Russell.

Many flock to the modest town for the five-day event and accommodation is usually very expensive. Check the festival website for more details on accommodation, tickets and Planning.

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Whānau Mārama: New Zealand International Film Festival 2022: eight must-see films https://cannesfest.org/whanau-marama-new-zealand-international-film-festival-2022-eight-must-see-films/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 17:05:00 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/whanau-marama-new-zealand-international-film-festival-2022-eight-must-see-films/ New Zealand’s annual world film festival is back. While the ongoing pandemic has greatly affected the Whānau Mārama: New Zealand International Film Festival over the past two years, the 2022 edition will take place in 14 cities and towns across the country over the next five weeks. A little smaller than before the Covid, this […]]]>

New Zealand’s annual world film festival is back.

While the ongoing pandemic has greatly affected the Whānau Mārama: New Zealand International Film Festival over the past two years, the 2022 edition will take place in 14 cities and towns across the country over the next five weeks.

A little smaller than before the Covid, this year’s program still includes a selection of the best titles that have been selected at renowned festivals such as Cannes, Berlin, Toronto and Sundance. As usual, the lineup offers something for everyone, from devastating dramas to offbeat comedies and documentaries on a wide range of topics.

Stuff to Watch has had the opportunity to view a number of titles and come up with this list of eight great widely released movies that we think are worth watching.

The Good Boss and Fire of Love are among the big films screening nationally as part of this year's New Zealand <a class=International Film Festival.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

Provided

The Good Boss and Fire of Love are among the big films screening nationally as part of this year’s New Zealand International Film Festival.

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Adeel Akhtar and Claire Rushbrook are Ali and Ava.

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Adeel Akhtar and Claire Rushbrook are Ali and Ava.

Ali and Ava (M)

Rightly nominated for two Baftas and a double winner at the British Independent Film Awards, Clio Barnard’s heartfelt romantic drama is set in Bradford about a budding relationship between an Irish-British teacher’s assistant and her five-year-old grandmother. occasions and an English-Pakistani owner still coming to terms with the breakdown of his marriage, will remind you of the best works of Mike Leigh and Ken Loach.

Claire Rushbrook and Adeel Akhtar are both gorgeous, together and apart, bringing a genuine sense of estranged heartache and a combined chemistry that’s both captivating and invigorating, while still rooted in sometimes depressing reality.

The subversiveness of Vicky Krieps as Empress Elizabeth of Austria in Corsage is reminiscent of Elle Fanning as Catherine in the television series The Great.

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The subversiveness of Vicky Krieps as Empress Elizabeth of Austria in Corsage is reminiscent of Elle Fanning as Catherine in the television series The Great.

Bodice (M)

Phantom Thread star Vicky Krieps plays Empress Elisabeth of Austria in this lavish, sensory drama from Austria’s late 19th century period.

Already the subject of intense public scrutiny – especially over her weight – Elizabeth’s 40th birthday is the catalyst for rebellion, as she tries to step back from public life and focus on her desires. This puts her offside, not only with the emperor, but also with other members of the royal house and court.

Its subversive character echoes Marie-Antoinette by Sofia Coppola and Catherine in The Great by Elle Fanning.

You will never be able to look at volcanoes the same way again after seeing Fire of Love.

Provided

You will never be able to look at volcanoes the same way again after seeing Fire of Love.

Love Fire (E)

This year’s answer to Bafta nominee Becoming Costeau (the subjects even have a fondness for the same red caps), Sara Dosa’s rather stunning documentary has enlightened the modern world on the work of French volcanologists Maurice and Katia Kraft.

Through breathtaking and highly entertaining archival footage – both men were filmmakers as much as scientists – you will witness their sometimes dangerous passion for lava lakes, lahars – and one for the ‘other.

Miranda July provides haunting, underused storytelling, but it’s the geologist and chemist couple’s visceral adventures that stay with you long after the credits roll.

Laure Calamy delivers an award-winning full-time trick.

Provided

Laure Calamy delivers an award-winning full-time trick.

Full time (M)

While its examination of the struggle to make ends meet in contemporary France covers similar ground to Juliette Binoche’s recent Between Two Worlds, writer-director Eric Gravel’s tale offers a much more immersive and emotional watch.

That’s thanks in large part to an incredible performance by Laure Calamy (who deservedly won an interpretation award from the Venice Film Festival last year) as Julie Roy, whose life increasingly more complicated is an endless juggling between work and home. Made even more strained by the effect of the transport strikes, she is desperate to return to market research, instead of working shifts in a luxury hotel, but trying to undertake the job interview process by secretly, she quickly exhausts the goodwill of her current co-workers.

Exhausting, heartbreaking and truly captivating viewing.

Javier Bardem is The Good Boss - or is he?

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Javier Bardem is The Good Boss – or is he?

The Good Boss (M)

Javier Bardem is at his charismatic and calculating best in this dark Spanish workplace comedy about a family business of scales having a hell of a week.

In line to win a prestigious civic award, the plant is plagued by mistakes caused by a senior member of staff distracted by marital strife, a recently fired employee waging a one-on-one war against Bardem CEO Julio Blanco, and the boss himself found out the intern he had fun with is actually someone he first met a long time ago.

Perfectly paced and pitched, writer-director Fernando Leon de Aranoa’s tale is an entertaining and engrossing watch – from start to finish.

Hallelujah examines both the life and times of Leonard Cohen and the ongoing cultural impact of a song he originally recorded in June 1984.

Provided

Hallelujah examines both the life and times of Leonard Cohen and the ongoing cultural impact of a song he originally recorded in June 1984.

Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen, a journey, a song (E)

More than a decade and a half after bringing festival audiences around the world one of the best dance documentaries of the 2000s (Ballet Russes), directors Dayna Goldfine and Daniel Geller are back with this look at the soup nuts the life and times of the Canadian troubadour.

While it doesn’t exactly cover unique ground, what sets it apart isn’t just its emphasis on the “minor downfalls and major upswings” of its career, but rather the ongoing cultural impact and interpretations in ever-changing song (both spiritually and sexually charged). , whereby seemingly vast lyrical options are used) he originally recorded in June 1984.

Alexei Navalny is not a fan of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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Alexei Navalny is not a fan of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Navalny (E)

The Vladimir Putin movie probably doesn’t want you to see it.

Canadian documentary filmmaker Daniel Roher delves into the world of aspiring Russian leader Alexei Navalny, a charismatic lawyer whose very public opposition from current Kremlin residents was cut short by a near-fatal poisoning in August 2020.

Evacuated to Germany, much of this sometimes stunning story focuses on his recovery in the Black Forest and trying to unravel what he, his family and his followers believed to be an assassination attempt, a search that culminates in one of the most amazing phone calls ever filmed. .

World War II chronicler Anne Frank and her imaginary friend Kitty come to life in Where's Anne Frank?

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World War II chronicler Anne Frank and her imaginary friend Kitty come to life in Where’s Anne Frank?

Where is Anne Frank? (PG)

Bridgerton’s Ruby Stokes voices the World War II chronicler’s imaginary best friend, Kitty, in this poignant and beautifully told animated feature.

As with his Oscar- and Bafta-nominated Waltz with Bashir, writer-director Ari Folman seamlessly combines historical fact with sometimes whimsical, sometimes heartbreaking imagery, as Kitty is first “animated” by love at first sight. , then his memories wake up while reading. famous diary of its creator Anne Frank.

Dedicated to her parents, who arrived at the gates of Auschwitz the same week as the Frank family, Folman makes Anne’s nearly 80-year-old story of urgent relevance, offering modern allegories and lessons for an audience of all ages.

Kicking off in Auckland on Thursday (July 28-August 7), this year’s edition of Whānau Mārama: New Zealand International Film Festival will also travel to Wellington (August 4-14), Christchurch (August 5-14), Dunedin (August 11-21), New Plymouth (August 11-21), Masterton (August 17-31), Matakana (August 18-28), Hamilton (August 18-31), Tauranga (August 18-28), Hawke’s Bay (August 18-28), Palmerston North (August 18-28), Nelson (August 18-28) , Timaru (August 18-28) and Gore (August 18-25).

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Films from the 2022 Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/films-from-the-2022-film-festival/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 17:59:09 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/films-from-the-2022-film-festival/ Film festivals are the lifeblood of the film industry. Thousands of people descend on a city for a week to watch dozens of brand-new movies and seek out adoring fans. Some independent films are out there looking for distributors to put them in theaters or on streaming platforms. Others are there to compete for prizes, […]]]>

Film festivals are the lifeblood of the film industry. Thousands of people descend on a city for a week to watch dozens of brand-new movies and seek out adoring fans. Some independent films are out there looking for distributors to put them in theaters or on streaming platforms. Others are there to compete for prizes, hoping that a glitzy win will launch the film into Oscar conversation or a packed box office. Even more are there just for publicity. After all, the industry’s most coveted eyes will all be in one place, so why not bring your film for them to see? Journalists roam the city, frantically writing reviews between screenings. Studio executives whisper into their phones, deciding which movies to buy and for how much. Filmmakers, actors and publicists attend after parties and previews to sell their work to the masses. And then of course there are the festival-goers to see as many films as possible in a few days.

While fall has a quartet of high-profile festivals primarily used to kick off Oscar campaigns (Venice, Telluride, Toronto and New York), the four major spring festivals are each unique in what they bring to the world. the cinema. The oldest, Sundance, held in the snowy, wintry town of Park City, Utah, is the largest independent film festival in the United States. Founded by Robert Redford, it tends to spawn independent darlings and documentaries. Whiplash, Palm Springsand last year CODA all debuted at Sundance. Usually in March, South by Southwest (SXSW or “South By” if you’re cool) happens, and unlike most other film-specific festivals, it’s also a TV, music and media festival. interactive. There are usually Sundance repeats with new independents and a few big budget premieres. Films as different as A silent place, Loan player oneand Library all entered the world at the Austin-based festival. The Tribeca Festival (formerly Tribeca Film Festival, but the “film” has been discontinued as the event has expanded into other media spheres) usually takes place in April in New York City. Started by Robert DeNiro to revitalize lower Manhattan after 9/11, the festival is a celebration of independent film. This post-COVID year, it was moved to June and became a launch pad for summer indies in addition to its competition and acquisition titles. And last but not least, there is the prestigious French competition of the Cannes Film Festival. This mostly international, author-focused event brings together the world’s best to compete for the coveted Palme d’Or, and while fewer hot US titles come out of this festival (as with the Berlinale), it’s certainly the pinnacle of world cinema and often launches contenders for the Oscar for best international film.

Since each of these festivals produces hundreds of films, many of which have no distributors when they premiere or have release dates much later, it can be difficult for non-professional moviegoers to know what to watch ( and where/when you can get your hands on it). To that end, I’ve compiled this handy list of the biggest and hottest titles from Sundance, South By, Cannes and Tribeca and where you can watch them. I’m here to make sure you look super knowledgeable at dinner parties, so check out the list, watch some of these great movies, and get ready to dazzle as the movie expert that you are!

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Belfast Film Festival launches international competition https://cannesfest.org/belfast-film-festival-launches-international-competition/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 12:58:00 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/belfast-film-festival-launches-international-competition/ The Belfast Film Festival launches into the international film market, but launches an inaugural feature film competition. The competition will be for first and second feature films according to US publication Variety. The prize fund will be a total of £10,000. It will also feature an international jury of filmmakers and industry professionals to judge […]]]>

The Belfast Film Festival launches into the international film market, but launches an inaugural feature film competition.

The competition will be for first and second feature films according to US publication Variety. The prize fund will be a total of £10,000. It will also feature an international jury of filmmakers and industry professionals to judge the films vying for the top prize.

This puts the Belfast festival, founded in 1995, in the same style as the Cannes and Venice film festivals. Both competitions feature star-studded selections in their respective juries, who review all of the films and collectively decide which feature will receive the awards.

The Belfast Film Festival will award a prize of £7,000 to Best Film Director, as well as Outstanding Craft Contribution and Outstanding Performance of £1,500 each.

Variety critic Jessica Kiang and Rose Baker have also been announced as the new festival programmers for this year’s screenings, which will run from November 3-12.

Speaking to Variety, Belfast Film Festival chairman Mark Cousins ​​said: “Jessica and Rose are savvy, bold and decisive in their tastes – just what a festival needs. We are delighted to have such big brains. And Jessica will be a dynamic emissary for the Belfast Film Festival around the world.

Michele Devlin, Director of the Belfast Film Festival, added: “The appointments of Kiang and Baker are one of the most exciting developments we have announced in many years. We look forward to new energy, new ideas and the start of an exciting new chapter in the life of the Belfast Film Festival.

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Belfast Film Festival appoints variety critic Jessica Kiang and Rose Baker as programmers and launches international competition (EXCLUSIVE) https://cannesfest.org/belfast-film-festival-appoints-variety-critic-jessica-kiang-and-rose-baker-as-programmers-and-launches-international-competition-exclusive/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 15:49:36 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/belfast-film-festival-appoints-variety-critic-jessica-kiang-and-rose-baker-as-programmers-and-launches-international-competition-exclusive/ The Belfast Film Festival named Variety film critic Jessica Kiang and Rose Baker as new programmers, and also launched an inaugural feature film competition. Kiang and Baker will serve as the creative leads at this year’s BFF, which runs from November 3-12. Kiang will program international titles and Baker will direct films from the UK […]]]>

The Belfast Film Festival named Variety film critic Jessica Kiang and Rose Baker as new programmers, and also launched an inaugural feature film competition.

Kiang and Baker will serve as the creative leads at this year’s BFF, which runs from November 3-12. Kiang will program international titles and Baker will direct films from the UK and Ireland.

More Variety

Kiang served as an international film critic for Variety since 2016, covering new releases and international film festivals such as Cannes, Venice, Berlin, Karlovy Vary, San Sebastian, Sundance, Busan, Shanghai and Toronto. She will continue to revise for Variety. She also contributes to Sight & Sound, The New York Times, The LA Times, The Playlist, Rolling Stone, Film Comment and Criterion.

Kiang is a regular on festival juries, having recently judged the main competition at the 2021 BFI London Film Festival; the main competition of the Amsterdam International Documentary Festival 2021; and the Platform 2019 competition at the Toronto International Film Festival. Kiang was also a mentor at the Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) Critics Campus in 2018, and will be at MIFF again in this capacity next month. She has also been a panelist for the Locarno Critics Academy, Gotham Awards, Indie Spirits and Venice Biennale College.

Meanwhile, Baker is co-founder and director of Wanda: Feminism & Moving Image, the first festival of its kind in the North of Ireland, focusing on archival films, documentaries and new cinema with an approach intersectional.

Baker previously worked as an assistant programmer and short film programmer for the Belfast Film Festival and on curating short films for BFF’s non-fiction festival, Docs Ireland. She is currently a PhD student in media arts at Royal Holloway University in London. Baker is passionate about rediscovering and exhibiting film and television archives, and celebrating it with new audiences.

Elsewhere, BFF is launching an international competition for first and second feature films, with a total prize of £10,000 ($11,963). An international jury of filmmakers and industry professionals will award a prize of £7,000 to the director for best film, as well as jury prizes for outstanding craft contribution and outstanding performance of £1,500 each.

Marc Cousinschairman of the Belfast Film Festival and director of ‘The Story of Film’, said: “Jessica and Rose are savvy, bold and decisive in their tastes – just what a festival needs. We are delighted to have such big brains. And Jessica will be a dynamic emissary for the Belfast Film Festival around the world.

Michele Devlin, Director of the Belfast Film Festival, added: “The appointments of Kiang and Baker are one of the most exciting developments we have announced in many years. We look forward to new energy, new ideas and the start of an exciting new chapter in the life of the Belfast Film Festival.

(Photo, L-R: Jessica Kiang, Rose Baker)

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Indian Film Festival goes beyond Bollywood | Cinema | DW https://cannesfest.org/indian-film-festival-goes-beyond-bollywood-cinema-dw/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 08:44:27 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/indian-film-festival-goes-beyond-bollywood-cinema-dw/ Until a few years ago, the Stuttgart festival in southern Germany was called “Bollywood and beyond”, a celebration of mainstream Indian cinema, with auteur films on the sidelines. But the standard song-and-dance theater was starting to cost the organizers of the annual Stuttgart event. “This Bollywood factor, you can clearly tell now, was a huge […]]]>

Until a few years ago, the Stuttgart festival in southern Germany was called “Bollywood and beyond”, a celebration of mainstream Indian cinema, with auteur films on the sidelines. But the standard song-and-dance theater was starting to cost the organizers of the annual Stuttgart event.

“This Bollywood factor, you can clearly tell now, was a huge industry and as a small festival in Stuttgart we couldn’t keep up,” says festival spokesman Hans-Peter Jahn. Bollywood movie producers often charge high prices for big movies, and it would have been impossible to pitch an actor from those movies in Stuttgart, he explained.

However, Bollywood’s big movie era seems to be waning and new, more engaged filmmakers are showing their films, Jahn added. Luckily, the pandemic-induced lockdowns proved a boon for low-budget filmmakers, who also benefited from national and global exposure on streaming websites like Amazon Prime and Netflix.

The festival also brings together German fans of Indian cinema

The day of the underdogs in the sun

This year’s selection offers a wide variety of works from almost all parts of India. One of the highlights of the festival is the Oscar-winning documentary directed by Sushmit Ghosh and Rintu Thomas, “Writing with Fire”.

The film chronicles the struggle of the women who run “Khabar Lahariya” (Hindi for “Waves of news”), a newspaper in rural northern India. For many people living in the area, the newspaper is an independent source of information. The newspaper was also honored for its outstanding work by DW at the Global Media Forum in 2014.

Other entries this year include director Irfana Majumdar’s “Shankar’s Fairies,” which tells the story of a master-servant relationship across generations.

“Tangra Blues” is a rap musical in Bengali. It tells the stories of children from the slums of Kolkata who want to succeed in life.

Directed by Manjari Makiani, “Skater Girl” tells a similar story, about a girl who wants to challenge her village’s restrictive culture that keeps female family members from leaving home and marrying them off early.

A highlight of this year’s event is “Jhund” (Hindi for herd), which features Indian superstar Amitabh Bachchan, and is based on the life of Vijay Barse, who founded the NGO Slum Soccer in Nagpur. , in western India.

Rethinking Gandhi

Another “must-see” recommendation from the organizers is the film “Adieu Godard” by director Amartya Bhattacharya, about a man from a village in Bengal, who usually watches porn movies every night. One day, he accidentally borrows a video from French director Jean Luc Godard and becomes addicted to his films. He then proposed a Godard film festival in his village, creating confusion and controversy.

Manish Saini’s film “Gandhi & Co,” about two children who like to play pranks, revisits the importance of the Mahatma’s culture.

South Indian films include director Shyamaprasad’s “Kasiminte Kadal,” about a teenager who is forced to move to a seaside town with his terminally ill father. Another is “Karma Café”, by Vinod Bharathan, about a man who returns from abroad and has to prove himself to the outside world.

Shorts include “Bedsores” by Navin Chandra Ganes; the documentary depicts the life of the Banchhada tribesmen in central India, where the birth of girls is considered lucky.

Devashish Makhija’s “Cheepatakadumpa” takes viewers through the lives of three male friends who openly talk about their sexual experiences.

Amitabh Bachchan

One of India’s legendary actors: Amitabh Bachchan in a 1981 film still

At the end of the festival on July 24, jury members will announce the winners in three categories, including Best Feature Film, Best Documentary and Best Short Film. The winners of the first category will receive €4,000, while the other two categories will receive a prize of €1,000 each.

Curator of Indian Film Medal

The Stuttgart Indian Film Festival is organized annually by the Filmbüro Baden Württemberg. The main sponsor of the event is Andreas Lapp, entrepreneur and Honorary Consul of Baden-Württemberg for the Republic of India. This year, organizers are also paying tribute to the festival’s curator, Mumbai-based Uma da Cunha, who has been curating films for the event for nearly two decades.

 Uma da Cunha (left) with her husband, Gerson

Uma da Cunha (left) has been organizing the festival for almost two decades

The curator will receive the Baden-Württemberg State Staufer Medal from Prime Minister Winfried Kretschmann on July 20. Since the late 1970s, da Cunha has helped organize Indian film festivals abroad, including in Toronto and Busan, and is the founding advisor to Indian film festivals in Los Angeles, London, The Hague, Montreal and Houston.

She is also a prominent casting director, having worked on films like Jane Campion’s ‘Holy Smoke’, Deepa Mehta’s ‘Water’ and Ashutosh Gowarikar’s ‘Lagaan’. In 2009, da Cunha was a member of the Cannes Film Festival jury in the Un Certain Regard category.

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Mariam Khatchvani • Founder and Artistic Director, Svaneti International Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/mariam-khatchvani-founder-and-artistic-director-svaneti-international-film-festival/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 13:59:07 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/mariam-khatchvani-founder-and-artistic-director-svaneti-international-film-festival/ 07/18/2022 – The filmmaker talks to us about the future of the festival she created Mariam KhachvaniGeorgian director of the acclaimed feature film Dede [+see also: film reviewtrailerfilm profile] on the mountainous region of Svaneti where she was born, turns her attention to film festivals. In its second edition, the Svaneti International Film Festival – co-founded with […]]]>

– The filmmaker talks to us about the future of the festival she created

Mariam KhachvaniGeorgian director of the acclaimed feature film Dede [+see also:
film review
trailer
film profile
]
on the mountainous region of Svaneti where she was born, turns her attention to film festivals. In its second edition, the Svaneti International Film Festival – co-founded with Teimuraz Chkhvimiani – organized a short film competition and a presentation session of upcoming Georgian projects, judged by an international jury, as well as a series of masterclasses and special screenings, including Brighton 4e [+see also:
film review
trailer
interview: Levan Koguashvili
film profile
]
.

(The article continues below – Commercial information)

Cineuropa: I would be curious to know what was the first idea behind the decision to found a film festival. What were you trying to accomplish?
Mariam Khachvani: When we started dreaming about it, we wanted to create the Svaneti Residence. I myself took part in similar initiatives, such as the Cannes Cinéfondation for example, and wrote in Ouchguli [a community of five villages] is simply the best. You can really relax here, it’s the most beautiful and authentic place. People who work in the cinema, who write or direct, they need to escape all the noise, I think, in order to be able to concentrate on their projects. When I’m in Svaneti, I always find good ideas.

Last year, this residency focused only on Georgian filmmakers, also due to budget constraints. It was the same this year, but we would certainly like to open it up to international participants in the future. We also want to develop the industrial part, because that is what we need in Georgia. We need this platform. It would be good to invite international industry players and introduce them to Georgian filmmakers. These plans are still in their infancy, but hopefully we will find our way in the next few years.

It’s interesting to be here and see the posters of Dede everywhere, hearing the locals talking about it. You had so much international success with this film. Do you think that helped when creating this event?
It helped me a lot. I got support from the Ministry of Culture, the Georgian National Tourism Administration and the Georgian National Film Center. They already knew me and thought maybe I could create a nice film festival. Tourists like to watch Dede here in Svaneti, because it shows this place and its culture. You can see how life used to be here and still is sometimes. I have to say that I don’t want to focus only on the festival and completely forget about my job. Last year and now, during this second edition, I put a lot of energy into it. But I hope that at some point my staff will take over.

What are you going to focus on next, do you think? This year, you are mainly screening short films, but the opening film was Brighton 4epresented by its director Levan Koguashvili.
Having short films in competition, as well as the development of an industry event, we may add another competition later. The short films work very well with the local public, broadcasting them also allows us to invite some young directors. They are inspired by what they see. I really think that’s how they should start their career: making short films. Now, at least here, that’s not the case – they immediately want to make feature films. But it just doesn’t work! That’s how I started and it helped me a lot.

Have the inhabitants always supported this initiative?
I think they’re glad there’s a festival here, but people don’t go to the movies often in Georgia – at least not to watch arthouse movies. Which, of course, isn’t great. You have to encourage them, show them all those good movies and maybe they’ll remember them later?

Last year’s edition was complicated because of the pandemic, we had to change our dates. Now in the summer we have started outdoor screenings to ‘invite’ people – that way they don’t feel too pressured. They can just come and see, and if they like what they see, then they go to the movies. It takes time to get people’s attention, but I can also say that this year more locals were coming to our screenings. We also had more media coverage this year. Let’s hope it will continue like this.

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