festival place – Cannes Fest http://cannesfest.org/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 12:26:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cannesfest.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png festival place – Cannes Fest http://cannesfest.org/ 32 32 Cleveland International Film Festival joins boycott of Russian cinema https://cannesfest.org/cleveland-international-film-festival-joins-boycott-of-russian-cinema/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 16:01:00 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/cleveland-international-film-festival-joins-boycott-of-russian-cinema/ CLEVELAND, Ohio — When the Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF) announced its 2022 film lineup Monday morning, it featured filmmakers from around the world. But one country particularly absent from the mix was Russia. The festival said in a statement that it had removed its Russian films from its initial lineup, due to the ongoing […]]]>

CLEVELAND, Ohio — When the Cleveland International Film Festival (CIFF) announced its 2022 film lineup Monday morning, it featured filmmakers from around the world. But one country particularly absent from the mix was Russia.

The festival said in a statement that it had removed its Russian films from its initial lineup, due to the ongoing conflict between Russia and Ukraine.

“No Looking Back” and “Unclenching the Fists” – two films originally scheduled to be part of the festival this year – will not be screened at the festival.

“The Cleveland International Film Festival joins cultural and artistic institutions around the world in standing in solidarity with Ukraine and its sovereign people. For this reason, we have made the difficult decision not to screen at CIFF46 any films produced by Russian-based companies or funded in any way by the Russian Federation,” the festival said in a statement.

CIFF said its decision to remove “No Looking Back” and “Unclenching the Fists” from programming was not based on the films’ content.

“The illegal and brutal actions of the Russian government are being challenged around the world,” CIFF said in a statement. “While we embrace artistic freedom and did not base our decision on any particular film’s content or storytellers, we must recognize that freedom itself is now at stake in Ukraine.”

CIFF has followed the Ukrainian Film Academy’s demand for a worldwide boycott of cinema associated with the Russian state. The organization launched a Change.org Petition calling for a boycott, and it collected more than 9,600 signatures Monday morning.

In its petition, the film academy specifically asked world film festivals not to screen any films created in cooperation with the Russian Federation.

“Several films made by Russia are regularly admitted to the programs of most world film festivals, and significant resources are devoted to their promotion,” the Ukrainian Film Academy shared in its petition. “The result of this activity is not just the dissemination of propaganda messages and distorted facts. It also reinforces the loyalty of Russian culture – the culture of the aggressor state, which has unleashed an unjustified and unprovoked war in Central Europe. Even the presence of Russian films in the program of world film festivals creates the illusion of Russia’s involvement in the values ​​of the civilized world.

Many organizations have already accepted the boycott or agreed not to screen films funded by the Russian Federation. The list includes the european film academy, Toronto International Film Festival and Cannes film festival.

CIFF’s centerpiece “Navalny” involves Russia, but focuses on Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny after he was poisoned in August 2020 by Russian security forces.

A Ukrainian film, “Klondike”, is included in CIFF’s 2022 lineup. The film focuses on Russian forces entering Ukraine, when a man and his pregnant wife find themselves near the border and struggle to stay safe. The film is based on the 2014 war in Donbass and the crash of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17.

The Cleveland International Film Festival will take place March 30-April 9 at Playhouse Square, and it will also be available to stream April 10-17.

Find more information about clevelandfilm.org.

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FESTIVALS: Sofia Film Festival 2022 set to kick off with postponement of Sofia meetings https://cannesfest.org/festivals-sofia-film-festival-2022-set-to-kick-off-with-postponement-of-sofia-meetings/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 21:36:16 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/festivals-sofia-film-festival-2022-set-to-kick-off-with-postponement-of-sofia-meetings/ SOFIA: 26th Sofia International Film Festival will take place from March 10-31, 2022, returning to its traditional physical event form. A total of 80 films from its programming will be screened online at the same time. Bulgaria’s most important film industry event Sofia Meetings postpones its 19th edition to the beginning of the summer. The […]]]>

SOFIA: 26th Sofia International Film Festival will take place from March 10-31, 2022, returning to its traditional physical event form. A total of 80 films from its programming will be screened online at the same time.

Bulgaria’s most important film industry event Sofia Meetings postpones its 19th edition to the beginning of the summer. The organizers promise that the well-known formats, mainly related to first and second film projects, will be back from June 6 to June 12, 2022.

The festival will also screen selected titles in Bulgaria’s second largest city, Plovdiv (March 17-27, 2022) and Varna (March 18-25, 2022). The city of Burgas will start its festival program on March 31, 2022.

Distinguished screenwriter and author Angel Wagenstein will be honored for his outstanding contribution to the art of cinema. In the year of his 100th birthday, he will receive the Prix Sofia de la Municipality of Sofia. The official ceremony will also include the screening of the digitally restored 1959 Cannes Grand Jury Prize winner Stars. The film will recall the exceptional collaboration between screenwriter Wagenstein and cult German director Konrad Wolf.

British director Tony Palmer will also receive recognition, this time it will be the special prize of the 26th edition of the SFF.

A retrospective titled women in cinema will illustrate the theme of this year’s festival. The films will be screened before the official opening on March 10, 2022, with the French Both sides of the blade directed by Claire Denis and produced by Curiosa Films.

Two Bulgarian debuts have been selected for the main international competition: Andrey Paunov January co-produced by Bulgarian Portokal, Portuguese Terratreme Filmes and Luxembourgish Tarantula, and Svetoslav Draganov Humbleco-produced by Bulgarian Contast Films with Romanians Parade Movie and digital cube.

The international jury will be led by Bulgarian director Iglika Triffonova and will also include four other directors: Lech Majewski from Poland, Oleg Sentsov from Ukraine, Radivoje Andrić from Serbia and Zlatina Rousseva from Bulgaria/Belgium.

International competition:

The wind seeker (Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia)
Directed by Mihai Sofronea
Produced by Balance Film Productions
Co-produced by Shuchkov BrothersLiving Pictures (Serbia), Romanian Cinema Center
Supported by the Bulgarian National Film Center, Film Center Serbia, Creative Europe MEDIA Program

The den (Italy)
Directed by Beatrice Baldacci

Wolf (Ireland, Poland)
Directed by Nathalie Biancheri
Co-produced by lava films

wild roots (Hungary, Slovakia)
Directed by Hajni Kis
Produced by Proton Cinema
Co-produced by MPilms
Supported by the National Film Institute of Hungary, Slovak Audiovisual Fund

The absent manager (Iran)
Directed by Arvand Dashtaray

A love song (UNITED STATES)
Directed by Max Walker-Silverman

Miss Osaka (Denmark, Norway, Japan)
Directed by Daniel Dencik

Waiting time (Turkey)
Directed by Aydin Orak

Humble (Bulgaria, Romania)
Directed by Svetoslav Draganov
Produced by Contast Films
Co-produced by Parade Movie and digital cube
Supported by the Bulgarian National Film Center, Romanian Cinema Center

Sonata (Poland)
Directed by Bartosz Blaschke
Produced by Mediabrigade
Supported by Polish Film Institute

Toubab (Germany, Senegal)
Directed by Florian Dietrich

January (Bulgaria, Portugal, Luxembourg)
Directed by Andrei Paunov
Produced by Portokal
Co-produced by Terratreme Filmes, Tarantula
Supported by Bulgarian National Film Center, Creative Europe MEDIA program

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Nicolas Rapold on the 72nd Berlin International Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/nicolas-rapold-on-the-72nd-berlin-international-film-festival/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 19:50:05 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/nicolas-rapold-on-the-72nd-berlin-international-film-festival/ Carla Simon, Alcarras2022, DCP, color, sound, 120 minutes. Iris (Ainet Jounou). AFTER SUNDANCE CANCELED its physical edition just two weeks before the opening, it was a comfort and a joy that the Berlinale had the chance to take place according to a simplified schedule. When the Golden Bear of the festival went to Carla Simón […]]]>

AFTER SUNDANCE CANCELED its physical edition just two weeks before the opening, it was a comfort and a joy that the Berlinale had the chance to take place according to a simplified schedule. When the Golden Bear of the festival went to Carla Simón Alcarras– a beautiful and useful rendition of a Catalan farmhouse fade – I couldn’t help but feel a feeling of ‘just happy to be here’ in the air. The composition of the contest’s jury – which put M. Night Shyamalan and Ryusuke Hamaguchi in the same room – was arguably more exciting than the stubbornness to equal careen Alcarras. But the good films at the 2022 edition were where we found them, and they were legion.

Or Alcarras seems to cut off when a scene gets interesting, The novelist’s film, a contest finalist, happily plays hopscotch in a funny comedy of contingent friendship and creative chance. Hong Sangsoo’s agile black-and-white feature begins with an acerbic writer (Lee Hye-young) visiting an old friend, now a bookstore owner, and daisy-chaining encounters until an actress in leave (Kim Minhee) enters the scene. Kim brings a delightful lightness of touch to her acting character, perhaps unexpectedly connecting with Lee’s obscurely driven writer, who is pursuing her dream of making a short film. From another headlining author, Claire Denis Both sides of the blade (to be released this summer as Fire in the United States) was like the dark side of Let the sun in, sharing a co-writer in autofiction author Christine Angot and taking a more linear approach than some of her past wakes. Cozy couple Vincent Lindon and Juliette Binoche (bringing a jitter to Denis’ cool beats again) are upset when a ghost from her past – Grégoire Colin as an old flame – consumes her completely, her obsession turning from mysterious to plain messy.


Claire Denis, Fire, 2022, 2K video, color, sound, 116 minutes.  Jean and Marie (Vincent Lindon and Juliette Binoche).

Denis won Best Director – amazing, his first prize in a major festival competition, I was told – and I was thrilled when another such award went to the one of the best directors of the festival for the first and second time. by Cyril Schaublin Disorders is the rare historical film to tap into the eerie energies of a buzzing moment when it feels like “everything has changed.” The setting seems comically calm – the watchmaking valley of the Swiss Jura in the 1870s – but it is the ground zero of industrial might and anarchist revolution, catching the attention of cartographer and Russian revolutionary Peter Kropotkin. I saw the film in a nearly empty press room on a quiet Sunday morning, and felt completely transported by Schaüblin’s quirky images of village workers, Kropotkin (at the dawn of a new political phase) , two Border Patrol agents and a jovial factory owner, as they negotiate a small society thriving with multiple time zones, new but immediately popular innovations like the telegraph and photographic postcards, and a measurement mania .

I had a similar reaction to another movie in the Encounters section, Qing dynasty queens, which was destabilizing in the best possible way. Canadian filmmaker Ashley McKenzie, whose feature debut Werewolf (2016) rubs shoulders with a marginal couple addicted to heroin, focuses here on Star (Sarah Walker), a teenager hospitalized after ingesting poison. The dazed affect of the patient is more a state of being than a momentary shock reaction. Wide-eyed, soft-jawed, cherubic, Star reacts to the world at her own pace and from home, often with a twisted sense of humor and neurodiverse outlook. Walker’s dreamy self-narrative and McKenzie’s lucid close-ups and soundscapes foster a deep and enduring sense of Star’s subjectivity (and creativity). Not that the film is entirely star-studded — she bonds with a sweetly mischievous hospital volunteer, An (Ziyin Zheng), who faces his own social exile as a queer immigrant from Shanghai. Assimilating avant-garde influences and incorporating eruptive animations, McKenzie’s bold film gives many other depictions of difference a studied or treasured look.


Ashley McKenzie, Queens of the Qing Dynasty, 2022, DCP, color, sound, 122 minutes.  An and Star (Ziyin Zheng and Sarah Walker).

by Alexander Zolotukhin brother in every inch has its own island quality as it follows two air force cadets, twin brothers, to a small training base in Russia. Initially, it looks like an entry into the nearly century-old genre of Glory-to-the-Motherland movies – burly guys walking around, awesome machines – so much so that I nearly ran away, with the invasion impending Ukrainian Russian. But Zolotukhin finds something strange and tragic in the brothers’ unbalanced connection, and even disrupts the required flight sequences, with the blackout of a twin in the air and a gust that obscures the wild blue there- low. Also in Dating, Small, slow but steady paints a thin, no-frills portrait of a deaf boxer from Tokyo’s Arakawa district. Thwarting just about every other boxing movie, director Sho Miyake eschews The Big Fight prep to tune into the quietly confident beats of Keiko (Yukino Kishii) amid the pandemic decline of her old-school gymnasium. On the lighter side, Quentin Dupieux Incredible but true argues its subject – the secret time-bending abilities of a couple’s newly purchased home – to more laughs than Gourmet FeedPeter Strickland’s final extended hermetic riff, this time about the tribulations of a performance band (apparently inspired by his own Sonic Catering Band) in maddening retreat.

Dry ground burning and After the water were two highlights of the more experimental part of the Forum, just like that of Alain Gomis Rewind and Play. Gomis’ modest study of found footage deconstructs Thelonius Monk’s performance on a French TV show in 1969, when he was called out for tedious covers and deeply uncool jokes. Among other varieties of documentary experience, Mitra Farahani See you Friday, Robinson curates a refreshing and irreverent epistolary exchange between Jean-Luc Godard and Iranian titan Ebrahim Golestan while casually nailing Godard’s own jarring edits and including the work of Godard DP Fabrice Aragno. (Launched with the festival, an exhibition at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt domesticated Godard’s 2018 The picture book spreading it across forty screens mostly perched on pro-grade shelves.) And in Mutzenbacher, Ruth Beckermann conducts a dizzying, often damning investigation into sexual mores by arranging an all-male casting for a film based on a 1906 pornographic novel featuring a minor. Tough and efficient, Beckermann seizes the opportunity to bring out the men – their candid personal stories, their sometimes startling reviews of the shocking book and, most unnervingly, their discussions of forbidden fantasies. His film draws a landscape of desire that awkwardly mixes the repulsive with the banal. It won Movie You Least Want to Watch Then Lock Eyes with the movie-loving grandpa next to you, but it also won Best Encounters Movie – well-deserved for a particularly fearless film during an impressive edition.

The 72nd Berlin International Film Festival took place from February 10 to 20.

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Exiled artists launch Hong Kong Film Festival in UK https://cannesfest.org/exiled-artists-launch-hong-kong-film-festival-in-uk/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 01:33:00 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/exiled-artists-launch-hong-kong-film-festival-in-uk/ Hong Kong protest films ‘Revolution of Our Times’ and ‘May You Stay Forever Young’ will have their UK premiere in March at a new film festival organized by artists and cultural workers who have moved to the Kingdom -United Ng Ka-leung, producer and director of the dystopian Hong Kong anthology “Ten Years”, and documentary filmmaker […]]]>

Hong Kong protest films ‘Revolution of Our Times’ and ‘May You Stay Forever Young’ will have their UK premiere in March at a new film festival organized by artists and cultural workers who have moved to the Kingdom -United

Ng Ka-leung, producer and director of the dystopian Hong Kong anthology “Ten Years”, and documentary filmmaker and writer Wong Ching, co-curators of the 2022 Hong Kong Film Festival UK, said the festival is not limited not screen films that may no longer be shown in their hometown due to political changes.

It is organized by Hong Kong Umbrella Community, a UK-based organization co-founded by Nathan Law, a former Hong Kong lawmaker who now lives in exile in Britain. The inaugural edition of the festival is funded by private donors, but event organizers hoped to raise funds from other sources for future editions.

The UK, Hong Kong’s former colonial master, became the new home for tens of thousands of Hong Kongers after the BNO visa program was launched last year. The scheme offers a route to British citizenship for holders of British National (Overseas) passports, which were only available to those born in Hong Kong before the city was ceded to China on July 1 1997.

Showing 16 titles – including six feature documentaries, five feature dramas and five shorts – in London, Manchester, Bristol and Edinburgh, they said, aims to promote contemporary Hong Kong film culture in the UK.

“Overseas audiences have long associated Hong Kong cinema with Wong Kar-wai and Bruce Lee. The focus on Hong Kong cinema among local and international audiences has also shifted to politics after 2019,” Ng told Variety. “But there’s so much more to Hong Kong film culture and we want to provide a fresh perspective.”

Raising the curtain on the inaugural edition of the festival, entitled “Rupture and Rebirth – new perspectives on Hong Kong’s era of upheaval”, is “Revolution of Our Times”, Kiwi Chow’s (“Ten Years”, “Beyond the Dream “) documentary about the 2019 Hong Kong protests which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival last year. The film, which also won Best Documentary Golden Horse last year, will debut in London on March 19 at the Genesis Cinema.

“Forever Young,” a protest-themed youth drama co-directed by Rex Ren and Sam Lam, will wrap up the London leg of the festival on March 27. The opening and closing films of the festival cannot be shown in Hong Kong after the implementation in 2020 of the National Security Law, which prohibits activities considered to be related to secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with enemy foreign forces. Last year, Hong Kong authorities also tightened the Film Censorship Act to effectively ban films that pose “threats to national security”.

The festival also features: “Inside the Red Brick Wall,” a protest documentary that was pulled from Hong Kong release last year after pro-Beijing politicians alleged the film might violate the NSL (but before that the censorship law is strengthened); as well as researcher Malte Kaeding’s “Black Bauhinia,” which documents the rise of Hong Kong’s localism and independence movements ahead of the 2019 protests.

Along with political titles, “Drifting,” Jun Li’s award-winning directorial title centered on the tragedy of homelessness, and “Ballad on the Shore,” a 2017 documentary by Ma Chi-hang that captures the last remaining memories of the songs of fishermen in the city, are also part of the selection.

Leung Ming-kai and Kate Reilly’s ‘Memories to Choke On, Drinks to Wash Them Down’, winner of Best Screenplay at the 2020 Hong Kong Film Critics’ Society Awards, Simon Chung’s 2018 gay drama ‘I Miss You When I See You Also featured is “Gone with the Wind,” Fai Wan’s 2018 documentary about homelessness.

The restored 4K version of Fruit Chan’s “Made in Hong Kong” and Alvin Tsang’s family documentary “Reunification” (2015) are also shown.

Ng, a member of the organisation’s board of directors, admitted that some film distributors and rights holders had concerns when approached about collaborating with the new festival. It was never the festival’s intention to politicize the discussion through films, he said.

“We want to find a way to tell the stories of Hong Kong in turbulent times through films. It’s about maintaining Hong Kong’s cultural identity,” Wong said. The city’s once-thriving film industry has been muted lately, with a significant portion of staff now working on projects in mainland China.

The festival will take place from March 19 to 27, 2022 in London and from March 31 to April 10 in Manchester, Bristol and Edinburgh.

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The Beaufort International Film Festival attracts people from all over the world https://cannesfest.org/the-beaufort-international-film-festival-attracts-people-from-all-over-the-world/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 22:08:54 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/the-beaufort-international-film-festival-attracts-people-from-all-over-the-world/ How a small independent film festival became an international event When people think of movies and Beaufort, SC, they often think of iconic scenes from “Forrest Gump,” “The Big Chill,” or “Prince of Tides.” But this coastal town offers much more than serving as the backdrop for Oscar-winning productions – it’s also home to a […]]]>

How a small independent film festival became an international event

When people think of movies and Beaufort, SC, they often think of iconic scenes from “Forrest Gump,” “The Big Chill,” or “Prince of Tides.” But this coastal town offers much more than serving as the backdrop for Oscar-winning productions – it’s also home to a popular independent film festival produced each year by the Beaufort Film Society.

Ron Tucker | Provided

The Beaufort International Film Festival (BIFF) has grown from 500 attendees in 2007 to over 17,000 in 2020, and it will be held in person again this year, able to move forward with COVID safety protocols at a time when bigger film festivals such as Sundance have had to go entirely virtual.

The BIFF will take place from February 22 to 27, with 60 films chosen as official selections from 32 countries. Of these, 10 are making their world premieres and 42 are making their South Carolina debuts. Ticket sales are in line with pre-pandemic years, according to Ron Tucker, president of the Beaufort Film Society and co-director of BIFF.

“We have COVID safety protocols in place and are happy to be able to see everyone in person at the festival this month. We haven’t had to close for a single year because of the pandemic,” Tucker said. “There are nearly 100 filmmakers in attendance from across the United States and hailing from the UK, Canada, Brazil, France and Denmark.”

Beaufort as the next Telluride – or even Sundance?

BIFF did not start out as a popular international film festival. At first, Tucker was chairman of the Beaufort Regional Film Commission. In 2006 he began planning the first Beaufort Film Festival, which took place in 2007.

“We didn’t really know what to expect in our first year, and no one on our team had experience running a film festival. So it was a learning-as-you-go experience. That first year presented many challenges and we certainly made mistakes, but those mistakes were part of our learning experience and contributed to a more focused effort 16 years later,” Tucker said. “Although we didn’t look too far ahead, we believed that if all goes well, we could one day be the next Telluride, which started small like us 40 years earlier.”

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Berlin Film Festival records over 60 positive cases in first days – Deadline https://cannesfest.org/berlin-film-festival-records-over-60-positive-cases-in-first-days-deadline/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 12:10:00 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/berlin-film-festival-records-over-60-positive-cases-in-first-days-deadline/ EXCLUSIVE: The Berlin Film Festival, which kicked off on Thursday evening, has recorded more than 50 Covid-positive results from its testing procedures, organizers have confirmed to us. A festival spokesperson said: “Since the beginning of the festival, we have detected only eight cases of positive tests among the film crews. The Berlinale test buses, available […]]]>

EXCLUSIVE: The Berlin Film Festival, which kicked off on Thursday evening, has recorded more than 50 Covid-positive results from its testing procedures, organizers have confirmed to us.

A festival spokesperson said: “Since the beginning of the festival, we have detected only eight cases of positive tests among the film crews. The Berlinale test buses, available to both accredited and public, made approximately 2,700 tests and only 54 positive tests. »

The festival continued:In order to stop possible chains of infections, we thoroughly assess each case and each situation, following up all contacts and identifying possible risk situations. We are still in a pandemic period and obviously positive tests are still a reality in our daily lives. It’s good to hear that the positive test numbers are really low. With 2% positive tests, the figures are lower than the average percentage of positive tests around Berlin. »

While the 2% figure is reassuring, some may be alarmed by the overall high number of positive cases and the potential for spread. People who test positive should be quarantined.

Germany is currently experiencing a spike in the highly transmissible variant of Omicron. The country recorded 151,000 cases yesterday (a five-day low) and 122 deaths. There are currently 3.4 million active cases in the country, but only 0.1% of those people are in serious or critical condition.

By way of comparison, Cannes claimed last June that it was recording an average of three positive Covid results per day and carrying out up to 3,000 tests per day. The Venice Film Festival, which took place last September, carried out a total of 4,500 Covid tests in 11 days, returning just three positive results, organizers told us.

However, it is also important to note that the Covid context and testing regimes were different in each country and at each event.

Berlin organizers have implemented a series of Covid safety measures, including 50% cinema occupancy and daily testing. Accredited guests must be vaccinated. The situation meant fewer guests at the festival with sparse red carpets and the festival center itself much quieter.

While many festival regulars are happy to be back in the mix at a major film event, the decision to continue has sparked consternation in some media outlets.

Some actors have voluntarily stayed away. German actress Hanna Schygulla, who has a supporting role in the opening of the festival Peter Von Kanttold us on Friday:Omicron is at its peak in Berlin and I am a risk person. II would be paranoid about being infected and therefore wouldn’t appreciate being there. I’m fine now and I prefer to stay like this. The film’s co-star Isabelle Adjani was unable to travel from Paris due to close contact with Covid.

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‘Yanagawa’, ‘Aloners’ win top prizes at Vesoul Asian Film Festival https://cannesfest.org/yanagawa-aloners-win-top-prizes-at-vesoul-asian-film-festival/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 22:24:00 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/yanagawa-aloners-win-top-prizes-at-vesoul-asian-film-festival/ “Yanagawa” by Zhang Lu (China), “Aloners” by Hong Sung-eun (South Korea) and “Along the Sea” by Fujimoto Akio (Japan/Vietnam) were among the best winners of the International Asian Film Festival of Vesoul in France. “Yanagawa”, which opened the 2021 Pingyao Film Festival, won the Golden Cyclo, the festival’s highest honor awarded by the international jury. […]]]>

“Yanagawa” by Zhang Lu (China), “Aloners” by Hong Sung-eun (South Korea) and “Along the Sea” by Fujimoto Akio (Japan/Vietnam) were among the best winners of the International Asian Film Festival of Vesoul in France.

“Yanagawa”, which opened the 2021 Pingyao Film Festival, won the Golden Cyclo, the festival’s highest honor awarded by the international jury. “Aloners”, which has already won awards in Jeonju and Turin, won the International Jury Prize and the Netpac Jury Prize.

The Jury’s Grand Prize went to San Sebastian, Tokyo, and Fajr player “Along the Sea,” which also won the festival’s Critics’ Choice Award and the National Institute of Languages ​​Jury Prize. and Oriental Civilizations (INALCO). The INALCO jury also singled out “The Coffin Painter” by Da Fei (China).

The international jury gave special mentions to Chung Mong-Hong’s Venetian selection “The Falls” (Taiwan), “Gensan Punch” (Philippines/Japan), Busan winner Kim Ji Seok from Brillante Mendoza and “2000 Songs of Farida” by Yalkin Tuychiev (Uzbekistan). . “The Falls” also won the High School Jury Prize.

The festival’s fiction film audience award was shared by “No Land’s Man” by Mostofa Sarwar Farooki (Bangladesh/India/USA) and “No Choice” by Reza Dormishian (Iran).

The prize for best documentary went to “Indian Space Dreams” (India/United Kingdom) by Sue Sudbury and the Youth Jury Prize was awarded to “February 1” by Leila Macaire and Mo Mo (France/Myanmar).

The Marc Haaz jury, in memory of the technical director of the festival who died at the age of 33, went to “The Orphanage” by Shahrbanoo Sadat (Denmark/Luxembourg/France/Germany/Afghanistan/South Korea/US) .

The 28th edition of the festival opened with “Kandahar”, winner of Cannes 2001 by Iranian author Mohsen Makhmalbaf, and ended on February 8 with “The Horse Thieves” by Kazakh filmmaker Yerlan Nurmukhambetov. The paths of time.

The guest of honor at the 28th edition of the festival was Japanese filmmaker Fukada Koji, who was presented with an honorary golden cyclo for his career during the opening ceremony.

The jury for the international competition was chaired by Leila Hatami, winner of the Berlin Silver Bear for Best Actress for “A Separation” by Oscar winner Asghar Farhadi. Hatami also received an Honorary Golden Cyclo for Lifetime Achievement.

The 29th edition of the festival will take place from February 28 to March 7, 2023.

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The Waco Family & Faith International Film Festival leaves viewers thinking about important messages https://cannesfest.org/the-waco-family-faith-international-film-festival-leaves-viewers-thinking-about-important-messages/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 02:49:08 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/the-waco-family-faith-international-film-festival-leaves-viewers-thinking-about-important-messages/ Photo courtesy of Waco International Family and Faith Film Festival By Nicholas Foster | Journalist The third annual Waco Family & Faith International Film Festival took place this weekend at the Cinemark Waco and XD Cinemas. Many movies shared powerful messages and gave every audience something to contemplate. The event was scheduled to take place […]]]>

Photo courtesy of Waco International Family and Faith Film Festival

By Nicholas Foster | Journalist

The third annual Waco Family & Faith International Film Festival took place this weekend at the Cinemark Waco and XD Cinemas. Many movies shared powerful messages and gave every audience something to contemplate.

The event was scheduled to take place at multiple venues in Waco, but was moved due to inclement weather. To conclude the festival, an award ceremony took place in Pivovar.

The festival was organized and founded by Dr. Tyrha Lindsey-Warren, Clinical Assistant Professor of Marketing at Baylor. After the first five films screened, she sat down with several directors and actors from different films to answer questions from audience members, as well as discuss the production of each film.

“Our film festival mantra is to let your light shine, so that’s what we want to do, shine our little film festival light,” Lindsey-Warren said.

One show in particular lived up to the film festival mantra. Actor and pastor Terry Weaver starred in “Breaking Strongholds,” a television series that premiered at the festival.

“We are a non-profit organization, all of this is done through donations. It’s very unique to have a show funded by donations,” Weaver said. “All actors actually give their time and talent, so it’s a ministry for actors, myself included. It’s our way of serving outside of the typical church. What you’ll see during part of how this show has evolved is my son on the show, Ryan, is contemplating suicide. It changes over time and there’s a big change in character arch. The cast has such a passion for to serve and wants to do something about teen suicide, so when you come together for a mission like this, it’s amazing to work with people who have the same goal in mind.

Weaver said the series will be available on multiple streaming platforms in late May. Information will be posted on the show’s website as soon as more details become available to the public.

“It’s fun to see the evolution of what God is doing with the show,” Weaver said.

Waco native and film festival junkie Blake Cleave attended several screenings and said he was not disappointed.

“It was such a rich and powerful experience,” Cleave said. “Each film revealed an indispensable message. It was an amazing and empowering festival.

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River Valley Film Society Announces Second Fort Smith International Film Festival – The Free Weekly https://cannesfest.org/river-valley-film-society-announces-second-fort-smith-international-film-festival-the-free-weekly/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 19:55:30 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/river-valley-film-society-announces-second-fort-smith-international-film-festival-the-free-weekly/ MONIQUE HOOPER mhooper@nwadg.com Plans for the second Fort Smith International Film Festival are underway, with the River Valley Film Society holding a press conference on January 20 to announce details of the summer event and the significance of the “Borderlands” theme. The first festival received 396 submissions from 43 countries, with more than 130 […]]]>


MONIQUE HOOPER
mhooper@nwadg.com

Plans for the second Fort Smith International Film Festival are underway, with the River Valley Film Society holding a press conference on January 20 to announce details of the summer event and the significance of the “Borderlands” theme.

The first festival received 396 submissions from 43 countries, with more than 130 short films, music videos, documentaries and feature films screened.

“I love movies, so being able to share my love of movies with the town of Fort Smith and the river valley – it’s just a joy to have people come to see movies they never would have seen,” Brandon Chase Goldsmith, chairman of the film company and executive director of the film festival, said.

Goldsmith said the 2022 film festival will take place August 26-27 at Temple Live, 200 N. 11th St. He said Temple Live was chosen because the historic theater building will provide an all-in-one cinematic experience. one, with room for several of the screenings, Q&A panels, workshops and a lounge.

Submissions open via Film Freeway on February 4 and run through the end of June. This year’s categories are People of Color, Indigenous, Music Videos, High School and College Student Submissions, Documentaries, Short Films and Feature Films.

“So basically we have a whole range of films that we’re looking for, and throughout the process we try to keep our entry fees very accessible,” Goldsmith said. “They only go from $10 to $25 for very late entries on our fee. But students until the end of registration are free, because we really want to encourage student participation in the festival.

Goldsmith said the theme is both a nod to Fort Smith’s history as a frontier town and a way filmmakers and cinephiles live their lives — on the borders between different aspects of life like l age and ethnicity – allowing for a range of experiences and perspectives to be presented. .

“The film has a way of showing where those borders are overcome, or where people bump into borders. That’s where the creativity happens, it’s within those boundaries, and the movies bring those experiences to the big screen,” he explained.

“To me, that means we are at the limit of what is possible. We’re on the edge of what can be,” said Jeff Smith, member of the film company’s board of directors and chief financial officer of production company TGE Global Entertainment. “And when we sit at that threshold, when you sit at that line, that’s when dreaming can happen. For me, it’s one of the beautiful things about cinema. It’s someone’s dream, someone’s vision, and they can tell a story through that dream.

Smith said members of the TGE were invited to be keynote speakers at last year’s film festival, which led to a partnership with the film company to produce a film about the federal court deputy. ‘Arkansas, Bass Reeves.

TGE is also the company working on the construction of a multi-million dollar soundstage and film studio at Chaffee Crossing.

Brandon Goldsmith, president of the River Valley Film Society, speaks during a press conference Jan. 20 at Temple Live in Fort Smith announcing the 2022 Fort Smith International Film Festival. The event will take place on Jan. 26-27 August at Temple Live. (The Free Weekly/Hank Layton)

“That’s exactly why film festivals like this are so important to economies like Fort Smith,” Smith said.

Goldsmith noted that the festival also strengthens the local creative economy by creating jobs and showcasing regional talent to the world.

Talicia Richardson, executive director of 64.6 Downtown, explained that the creative economy involves the material and financial support needed to provide art in the community.

“By bringing another level of art to our community with the international film festival, we are expanding our reach in the community,” she added. “The young talent, the seasoned talent that is available in our community is here. It is time for us, through this film festival, to bring them out.

Goldsmith said he hopes the covid numbers will drop by August to allow more people to attend, but the film company intends to continue offering tickets online so people around the world can watch without having to travel. He added that once submissions open next month, the film company will provide more information on a series of pre-festival films in Fort Smith and Van Buren that will feature some of last year’s submissions.

“One of the things with cinema and independent film is that we have to build an audience,” Goldsmith said. “Plus, they’re just fun to watch.”

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FAQs

Fort Smith International Film Festival:

Borderlands

WHEN — August 26-27

WHERE — Temple Live, 200 N. 11th St. in Fort Smith

COST — Ticket packages coming soon

INFO — fortsmithfilm.com

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The Boulder International Film Festival welcomes Alec Baldwin back in March 2022 https://cannesfest.org/the-boulder-international-film-festival-welcomes-alec-baldwin-back-in-march-2022/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 13:00:49 +0000 https://cannesfest.org/the-boulder-international-film-festival-welcomes-alec-baldwin-back-in-march-2022/ Alec Baldwin takes the stage at the Boulder Theater during a BIFF tribute to him on February 14, 2010. (Cliff Grassmick, Daily Camera) The Boulder International Film Festival will celebrate its 18th year in March and, as well as returning to its Boulder Theater home after last year’s summer installment in Chautauqua, it welcomes Alec […]]]>

Alec Baldwin takes the stage at the Boulder Theater during a BIFF tribute to him on February 14, 2010. (Cliff Grassmick, Daily Camera)

The Boulder International Film Festival will celebrate its 18th year in March and, as well as returning to its Boulder Theater home after last year’s summer installment in Chautauqua, it welcomes Alec Baldwin.

Baldwin attended BIFF in 2010 where he received the festival’s Excellence Award for Actor.

“He’s been here before and he’s a friend of the festival, so we’re really excited,” said BIFF director Kathy Beeck, who founded the festival with her sister Robin Beeck.

This year, Baldwin—a lover of movies—will be the festival’s first-ever special guest programmer, where he’ll screen three films of his choice.

Baldwin selected “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Bomb,” “America’s Most Dangerous Man: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers,” and “Julia.”

After the screenings, he will do a brief Q&A with film critic and culture writer Lisa Kennedy. Tickets for the film screenings will go on sale with general program tickets on February 11.

Festival passes are on sale now for $495. BIFF gift sets – also on sale now – come in denominations of $34 (2 movie tickets), $68 (4 movie tickets) and $100 (6 movie tickets).

“I am very excited to return to the Boulder International Film Festival, which I last attended in 2010,” Baldwin said in a press release. “I think Boulder is a great city and I know they have a wonderful festival.”

At 6 p.m. on March 5, attendees can expect a more in-depth interview with Baldwin, conducted by Ron Bostwick, who interviewed Baldwin at BIFF 2010. The “30 Rock” star and Colorado Sound DJ Bostwick, will return to the Boulder Theater – where Baldwin’s career was celebrated locally over a decade ago – for a special tribute and cinematic retrospective of his work.

Alec Baldwin stands outside the Boulder Theater during BIFF 2010. (Courtesy Randy Malone)

Tickets for “A Conversation with Alec Baldwin” go on sale today at noon. Tickets are $60 and free for festival pass holders.

While BIFF has a strong focus on local talent, it has always attracted moviegoers from across the country, featuring top filmmakers and screening Oscar-winning films.

“We really value our community, but we recognize that the film festival also has a place on the national stage,” Beeck said.

Previous stars who have attended BIFF include James Franco, Oliver Stone, Shirley MacLaine, Martin Sheen, Jesse Eisenberg and Jakob Dylan.

Baldwin was recently part of an investigation into a fatal shooting on the set of “Rust” in New Mexico, a film he starred in and produced, where cinematographer Halyna Hutchins, 42, , was accidentally shot down on October 21.

The Beeck sister said Baldwin — who won seven straight Screen Actors Guild Awards for her role in NBC’s “30 Rock” — is staying up to date with them.

“She’s such a nice person,” Beeck said. “He loves cinema so much and he often calls the office to see what we are planning.”

While normally the Beecks have a full year to prepare, this time BIFF 2022 comes on the heels of BIFF 2021 which took place in June.

“We’re going full steam ahead,” Beeck said.

Music is still an integral part of BIFF and this year the organizers are once again welcoming a selection of artists who have played at the festival in previous years. Boulder stars Otis Taylor, Rebecca Folsom, Tom Wasinger and Chris Daniels’ Magic Music Duo are among the returning creators.

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